News / Middle East

Israel Declares 7-Hour Gaza Truce

  • Palestinians carry a person killed in a blast outside a U.N.-run school in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip, Aug. 3, 2014.
  • A Palestinian boy, who was wounded in an Israeli strike on a house in Beit Lahiya, northern Gaza Strip, sits on the floor as he waits to be treated at the emergency room of the Kamal Adwan hospital, in Beit Lahiya.
  • Israeli soldiers ride tanks after returning to Israel from Gaza.
  • A Palestinian comforts a woman, wounded in an Israeli strike at a house in Beit Lahiya, northern Gaza Strip, at the emergency room of the Kamal Adwan Hospital, in Beit Lahiya.
  • Palestinians evacuate a survivor of an Israeli air strike that hit the Al Ghoul family building in Rafah, southern Gaza Strip.
  • A Palestinian woman carries belongings while walking over the rubble of buildings destroyed by what police said were Israeli air strikes and shelling in Khuzaa, east of Khan Younis, in the southern Gaza Strip.
  • Israeli soldiers look towards Gaza from Israel.
  • A relative holds a dead baby during the funeral of members of Al Ghoul family in the Rafah refugee camp, in the southern Gaza Strip. At least 40 people were inside the Al Ghoul family building in Rafah when it was targeted by Israeli jet fighters, according to the Red Crescent and Gaza health official Ashraf al-Kidra.
VOA News

No accounts of violence have been reported Monday since the time Israel said it would begin holding fire for seven hours in most of the Gaza Strip to allow Palestinians access to humanitarian aid and for displaced civilians to return to their homes.

However, just hours before the truce was scheduled to start, an Israeli airstrike killed a militant Palestinian leader. The Islamic Jihad group said its commander in the northern part of the the Gaza Strip, Daniel Mansour, died when the strike hit his home. 

Israel positioned tanks near the Gaza border Monday before the cease-fire went into effect.

Hamas, which controls Gaza, is skeptical about the truce announcement, and urged Palestinians in Gaza "to take caution."

The truce was announced just hours after an Israeli airstrike in the southern Gaza town of Rafah killed at least 10 civilians who had sought shelter in a United Nations school.

The Israeli military later said it had targeted three suspected militants near the school, and said it was "reviewing the consequences" of the strike.  It also said Monday's truce will not apply to Rafah, where military operations were set to continue.

Witnesses said the school was struck as people were waiting in line for food. In the chaotic aftermath, several bodies, including those of children, were strewn across the ground in pools of blood.

The Israeli military said it was looking into the reported attack, the second to hit a school in less than a week, and the third strike in 10 days on a U.N. school used for refugees.

The latest attack drew a strong rebuke from U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon, who called it "a moral outrage and a criminal act."

In his most strongly worded statement yet on an attack against a U.N. facility in Gaza, Ban called it “yet another gross violation of international humanitarian law, which clearly requires protection by both parties of Palestinian civilians, U.N. staff and U.N. premises, among other civilian facilities.”

“This attack, along with other breaches of international law, must be swiftly investigated and those responsible held accountable. It is a moral outrage and a criminal act,” Ban said.

Watch related on-the-scene video by VOA's Scott Bobb:

Displaced Gazans Fear Returning Home Despite Israeli Assurancesi
X
Scott Bobb
August 03, 2014 9:59 PM
The Israeli military has told residents of several neighborhoods in Gaza that they may return home, seeming to indicate that the operation to destroy infiltration tunnels has ended in these parts of the enclave. However, most Gazans say they do not believe they will be safe. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Beit Lahiya in northern Gaza.

US reaction

The U.S. State Department initially referred to the school strike as "a shelling," with spokeswoman Jen Psaki calling it "appalling" and "disgraceful."

“The United States is appalled by today's disgraceful shelling outside an UNRWA school in Rafah sheltering some 3,000 displaced persons, in which at least ten more Palestinian civilians were tragically killed,” Psaki said in a statement. 

She urged Israel to do more to prevent civilian casualties in its war against Hamas militants, and also called for an investigation into recent attacks on U.N. schools.

An Israeli military spokesman Sunday said Hamas fired several mortars from the vicinity of that school on Saturday. But the U.S. said the suspicion that militants are operating nearby does not justify strikes that put "so many innocent civilians" at risk.

Last Wednesday, at least 15 Palestinians who sought refuge in a U.N.-run school in Jabalya refugee camp were killed during fighting, and the U.N. said it appeared that Israeli artillery had hit the building. The Israeli military said gunmen had fired mortar bombs from near the school and it shot back in response.

Hospitals in Gaza on Sunday struggled to cope with a new influx of wounded from Israeli airstrikes in recent days.

Palestinian officials said 1,766 people had been killed in the fighting, most of whom were civilians, and nearly 10,000 wounded.

From left, Ayelet, Zur, Lea, Simcha and Haimi, the family of Israeli soldier Lieutenant Hadar Goldin, mourn during his funeral in Kfar Saba, near Tel Aviv, Israel, August 3, 2014.From left, Ayelet, Zur, Lea, Simcha and Haimi, the family of Israeli soldier Lieutenant Hadar Goldin, mourn during his funeral in Kfar Saba, near Tel Aviv, Israel, August 3, 2014.

The Israeli military death toll rose to 64 after Israel announced that Hadar Goldin, a 23-year-old infantry lieutenant feared captured in Gaza, was actually killed in battle. His funeral is later Sunday.

Goldin's remains were identified with his DNA, said an Israeli military spokesman.

The attack that caused his death was the incident that broke a short-lived cease-fire on Friday and brought renewed fighting in which 180 people reportedly have died.

Rocket attacks

Hamas fired at least 50 rockets toward Israel on Sunday, the Israeli military said, and has fired more than 3,000 rockets since the war began last month, killing three three Israeli civilians and damaging several homes.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Saturday the ground operation to destroy infiltration tunnels into Israel was nearly ended.

More than 30 tunnels and dozens of access shafts have been unearthed and were being blown up, military officials said.

Israel expected to complete its mission to eliminate tunnels “probably within the next 24 hours or so,” military spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel Peter Lerner said.

Netanyahu said Israeli Defense Forces would continue to work until the tunnels are destroyed. And he added the forces were prepared to continue operating according to Israel's defense needs until security is restored to Israel.

Some Israeli ground troops on Sunday were seen leaving Gaza and re-deploying along the boundary with the territory.

Redeployment of Israeli troops

Lerner stopped short of calling the move a withdrawal, but said residents from some evacuated Palestinian neighborhoods had been told by the army they could return.

“The troops are in the midst of a redeployment to other parts of the border,” Lerner said. “Indeed we are releasing troops from the front line but the mission is ongoing. Ground forces are operating. Air forces are operating.”

A few Palestinians returned to their homes on Sunday but mostly to recover personal property and inspect their homes.

Eman al-Kahlot, whose extended family of 18 had taken refuge in the U.N.-run Remal Primary School in Gaza, said they would not be going home.

Kahlot said her family does not believe what Israel says because yesterday a family returned. The Israelis bombarded and they died. So we don't believe them, she said, because they always say one thing and do something else.

She said her family would return home only if there was a real cease-fire.

In Rafah, Fatah faction leader and local resident Ashraf Goma said Israeli forces were bombarding the town from air, ground and sea and locals were unable to deal with the wounded and the dead.

An Israeli army spokeswoman said that so far on Sunday at least 13 rockets were fired from Gaza at Israel. One was intercepted by Israel's anti-missile system and the rest landed in open areas.

Humanitarian aid

For the UN's Humanitarian Coordinator in the occupied Palestinian territory, James Rawley, Gaza is facing an imminent health disaster of widespread proportions as a result of the prolonged Israeli military operation in the Gaza Strip.

Speaking on Sunday, in Gaza City, Rawley said the enclave was already facing a real humanitarian disaster.

Hours before the interview an Isareli missile hit a U.N.-run school in Rafah killing at least 10 people, many of them children, and Rawley said nowhere in the enclave was safe for Palestinians and that it was worse for children.

"I have spoken to residents of Gaza that have moved from their homes, not once, not twice, but three times and they ask me: 'Mr Rawley, you work for the UN, where can I go?' and I have to tell them, 'I don't have an answer. There's no safe place in Gaza,' " he said.

"So we're seeing a real humanitarian disaster here, and let just say the impact on children is just absolutely appalling," Rawley said.

Rawley said the Gaza City UNDP building was sheltering around 250 U.N. workers and their families.

Earlier Sunday, a senior Palestinian diplomat expressed outrage over killings and bloodshed on both sides in Gaza and called for negotiations to end the savage fighting that has gone on for nearly a month.

“What we need now is to stop this fighting, to address the tragic humanitarian situation in the Gaza Strip,” Riyad Mansour, the Palestinian ambassador to the U.N., said on NBC's Meet the Press, adding “these things need to be stopped.”

Cease-fire terms

Israel is demanding the de-militarization of Gaza as part of any cease-fire accord. Hamas said it will keep on fighting until the seven-year Israeli blockade of Gaza is lifted.

Meanwhile, delegations from the Palestinian militant groups Hamas and Islamic Jihad have arrived in Cairo on Sunday to discuss a cease-fire proposal. The talks are being conducted by Egyptian and U.S. officials.

Sunday afternoon, Qais Abu Laila, a senior leader from the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine who was in Cairo, said the different Palestinian factions had agreed on a unified list of conditions.

“Ceasefire, the pullout of Israeli forces, ending the blockade, releasing the prisoners ... and starting the reconstruction process,” he told Reuters by phone.

But Israel said it saw no point in sending negotiators to the Egyptian capital, citing what it said were Hamas breaches of previous cease-fires that quickly collapsed.

Netanyahu said Saturday that hundreds of Hamas militants have been killed since Israel launched its ground and air operations almost a month ago. Netanyahu warned that Hamas would pay an "intolerable" price if it failed to stop rocket attacks on Israel.

Netanyahu stressed that Israel has nothing against the "peaceful citizens of Gaza." He said he was very sorry for each civilian killed or wounded.

Netanyahu said Gaza's dominant Hamas faction bears ultimate responsibility for civilian casualties, accusing gunmen and rocket-launching squads of using residents in densely populated areas as “human shields.”

He also encouraged international support to help rebuild Gaza.

The United Nations said 460,000 people had been displaced by the fighting - nearly a quarter of Gaza's population.  

Palestinians say Israeli attacks on Gaza have killed 1,800 Palestinians, most of them civilians. More than 8,000 have been wounded.  Israel says 64 of its soldiers and three civilians have been killed.

Scott Bobb contributed to this from Gaza. Some information for this report was provided by Reuters, AP and AFP.

You May Like

Obama: I Will Do 'Everything I Can' to Close Guantanamo

US president says prison continues 'to inspire jihadists and extremists around the world' More

Sierra Leone Educates on Safe Ebola Burials

Also, country is improving at rapid response to isolated outbreaks, but health workers need to be even faster, officials say More

Religion Aside, Christmas Gains Popularity in Communist Vietnam

Increasingly wealthy Vietnamese embrace holiday due to its non-religious glamor, commercial appeal More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
 Previous    
by: Michael Valente
August 03, 2014 10:33 AM
There are only two groups that could care less about Palestinian women and children. Israelis and Hamas........ so,there's something that they may have in common.
How nice


by: E Hamptons from: USA
August 03, 2014 10:29 AM
School/Rocket Launcher site. Tell the truth... the COWARDS of Hamas use the schools as bunkers to launch rockets. ZERO sympathy.


by: Arnold R from: New York
August 03, 2014 10:28 AM
Whenever attacks by Hamas or anyone else Arabic occur to Israel they are very quick to condemn the attackers and they have many countries and their leaders backing their assertions, but when Israel wants to attack and kill children and other innocents, they have no problems doing it.

Rather contradictory I would say. And I don't want to hear about "alleged" reports saying the site was a know Hamas stronghold or some other such poppycock.


by: donnie from: azle, tx
August 03, 2014 10:18 AM
It appears that the Israeli s are intentionally targeting civilians in a


campaign to break the will of people of Gaza and to weaken their support of Hamas.

In Response

by: FactsareFacts
August 03, 2014 11:23 AM
What a ridiculous analysis, targeting civilians would only breed anymous toward Israel. They are clearly doing all they can to avoid civilians which is very dificult when Hamas places them in harms way. You can't simply stop a defensive military action when your enemy places obsticles in your way.

In Response

by: Sam Kinneson from: Sarasota FL
August 03, 2014 10:57 AM
If they really wanted to kill civilians I think they'd be far more efficient (and effective). It's pretty clear who bears the ultimate blame for this fiasco.
If your neighborhood received numerous indiscriminate missile strikes over a two week period, would you protect yourself? If your attacker stored munitions in civilian homes, rockets in schools, and set up a headquarters underneath a hospital, how would you respond? Perhaps you would ask for the attackers to stop and then wait. I would not. In fact, I think that Israel is exercising extreme moderation in its response. Personally, I would force every last person out of Gaza into the desert for a couple of weeks -- then I'd destroy the infrastructure and let the (very impartial) U.N. rebuild it. -Sam

In Response

by: Liberty from: US
August 03, 2014 10:44 AM
Those are by definition strategies of terrorism. The killing of civillians to influence a political party.

In Response

by: nvr from: USA
August 03, 2014 10:41 AM
It does not just appear that they are targeting civilians they are.


by: Tom from: usa
August 03, 2014 10:16 AM
If Hammas really cares about their people why in the name of God do they continue to launch rockets into Israel. Its all for nothing . You cant blame Israel for protecting themselves. Hammas has launched thousands of rockets into Israel. Enough is enough.

In Response

by: cher from: phoenix
August 03, 2014 11:13 AM
I so so agree with you on this .


by: Yang from: Laos
August 03, 2014 10:07 AM
Why UN so love Hamas ppl? have schools everywhere in Gaza, sponsor Hamas to have refugees camps forever, I think very bad idea for UN to do that, if UN support everything for them, make them lazy and wait for help forever, Why UN don't care our ppl in jungle of Laos, my ppl got kill like animal by the Communist Laos deng and UN had ignored for them see (youtube kill like animal in Laos) UN is unfair for some ppl, some countries around the world and treat them not equally.


by: Faiyaz Ahmed S M from: India
August 03, 2014 8:39 AM
Israel PM should refrain from saying sorry because to read it is more painful than his actions. One would expect the child of Nazi crimes and victim of Hamas missiles to show empathy towards his own victims which is not to be. The least he can do is refrain from rubbing salt into their wounds.


by: Anthonybellchambers from: London
August 03, 2014 8:28 AM
Children are 'abducted' from kindergarten but soldiers are 'captured' on the battlefield (if from American, Russian, Japanese, British, German or French professional armies).



So, after a huge and obscene diversion about a heavily-armed, Israeli soldier allegedly 'abducted' by Hamas, it is now discovered he was, in fact, killed in action - unlike the 1000 unarmed men, women and children Israel has liquidated in an orgy of atrocity against a civilian population, in Gaza.



Nothing highlights the out-of-control conduct of Israel's army and prime minister as accurately as this fiasco that says more about this asymmetrical conflict between a nuclear weapons state and an oppressed people, still under an 8 year economic and military blockade, than any official UN report.



Given that there was no capture/ abduction, then the IDF has killed hundreds of Palestinian civilians in the past 24 hours in a retaliation that was clearly a war crime under the Geneva Conventions.



Which leaves the question: ‘When will President Obama instruct Binyamin Netanyahu to submit himself to the International Criminal Court, in The Hague, on an indictment of criminal action against a civilian population?’

Comments page of 2
 Previous    

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
US Decision on Cuba Underscores Divisions Among Miami Cubansi
X
Sharon Behn
December 19, 2014 9:34 PM
For decades, older, more conservative Cubans have been gathering at Café Versailles on the corner of Calle Ocho to eat Cuban food and talk politics. After hearing of President Barack Obama’s decision, a number of them gathered in front of the café with posters to protest. VOA's Sharon Behn reports on the situation.
Video

Video US Decision on Cuba Underscores Divisions Among Miami Cubans

For decades, older, more conservative Cubans have been gathering at Café Versailles on the corner of Calle Ocho to eat Cuban food and talk politics. After hearing of President Barack Obama’s decision, a number of them gathered in front of the café with posters to protest. VOA's Sharon Behn reports on the situation.
Video

Video Three Cities Bid for Future Obama Presidential Library

President Barack Obama still has two years left in his term in office, but the effort to establish his post-presidential library is already underway. The bid for the Obama Presidential Library is down to four locations in three states -- New York, Hawaii, and Illinois. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, each of them played an important part in the president’s life before he reached the White House.
Video

Video Cuba Deal is Major Victory for Pope’s Diplomatic Initiatives

Pope Francis played a key role in brokering the US-Cuba deal that was made public earlier this week. It is the most stunning success so far in a series of peacemaking efforts by the pontiff. VOA religion reporter Jerome Socolovsky has more.
Video

Video Fears of More Political Gridlock in 2015

2014 proved to be a difficult year politically for President Barack Obama and a very good year for the U.S. Republican Party. Republican gains in the November midterm elections gave them control of the Senate and House of Representatives for the next two years -- setting the stage for more confrontation and gridlock in the final two years of the Obama presidency. VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone has a preview from Washington.
Video

Video Sudan School Becomes Target of Aerial Attacks

The school dropout rate is at an all-time high in Sudan's South Kordofan state because many schools have been destroyed during the three-year civil war between the government and SPLA-N rebel forces. Adam Bailes visited Sudan's Nuba Mountains' region and reports many children are simply too scared to go to school
Video

Video VOA Reporter Tours Devastated Peshawar School

Islamist militants wearing military uniforms and strapped with explosives attacked a military run school Tuesday in the northwestern Pakistani city of Peshawar. At least 141 people were killed in the horrific attack, most of them young students. VOA reporter Ayaz Gul visited the devastated school and attended the funeral of the principal who courageously tried to save her students from the deadly attack.
Video

Video Nigerians Fleeing Boko Haram Languish in Camp Near Capital

In its five-year effort to impose Islamic law in northeastern Nigeria, the Boko Haram extremist group has killed thousands of people and forced hundreds of thousands to flee. Some of those who ran for their lives now live in squalor on the edges of the capital, Abuja. Chris Stein reports for VOA.
Video

Video Aceh Rebuilt Decade After Tsunami, But Scars Remain

On December 26, 2004 there was an earthquake in the Indian Ocean so powerful it caused the Earth’s axis to wobble a few centimeters. Onshore on the island of Sumatra, the resulting tsunami was devastating. A decade later, VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Banda Aceh, Indonesia, where although there is little remaining evidence of the physical devastation, the psychological scars among survivors remain.

All About America

AppleAndroid