News / Africa

    South Africans Mourn Mandela

    Nelson Mandela Dies at 95, World Mourns South Africa's Former Presidenti
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    December 06, 2013 4:29 AM
    Nelson Mandela has died. The former president of South Africa is credited with ending Aparteid in that country. Mandela emerged from 27 years in prison to lead his country. VOA's Carolyn Presutti has the details.
    Anita Powell
    South Africa will hold a period of mourning unparalleled in the nation’s history, as the world marks the death of anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela.  South Africans have already made pilgrimages to his Johannesburg homes to leave flowers, candles and notes celebrating the life of the man credited with ending South Africa’s racist apartheid system. In the coming week, the government plans to honor him on a grand scale.
     
    South Africa’s government plans to remember the nation’s first black president with events that celebrate his life while also addressing the deep void that many South Africans feel.


    Mandela, who died late Thursday at the age of 95, will be laid to rest on Sunday, December 15, in a family ceremony in his ancestral home in the rural Eastern Cape town of Qunu.
     
    South African President Jacob Zuma, who appeared haggard on Friday, said the nation will hold several events in the week before the burial.  
     
    Like many South Africans, Zuma referred to the anti-apartheid icon by his clan name, Madiba.

    • People sing and dance during a gathering of mourners on Vilakazi Street in Soweto, Dec. 6, 2013.
    • A young girl with a poster of Nelson Mandela marches with others to celebrate his life, in the street outside his old house in Soweto, Johannesburg, Dec. 6, 2013.
    • Township residents march to celebrate the life of Nelson Mandela in the street outside his old house in Soweto, Johannesburg, Dec. 6, 2013.
    • A woman cries as she holds a candle and a flower outside former South African President Nelson Mandela's house in Houghton, Dec. 5, 2013a
    • A girl holds a South African national flag as people mourn the death of Nelson Mandela outside Cape Town City Hall, Dec. 6, 2013.
    • Keaton Anderson, 10, poses for a photograph for his father Dijon Anderson as they visit the statue of Nelson Mandela at the South African Embassy in Washington, Dec. 5, 2013.
    • Newspapers with pictures of Nelson Mandela on the front page on sale in London, Dec. 6, 2013.
    • Schoolchildren hold candles and portraits of Nelson Mandela during a prayer ceremony at a school in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad, Dec. 6, 2013.
    • A woman with a banner pays tribute to Nelson Mandela outside the South African High Commission in London, Dec. 6, 2013.
    • People release paper lanterns after lighting them outside Madiba, a restaurant named in honor of Nelson Mandela, in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Dec. 5, 2013.
    • People listen to a radio as South African President Jacob Zuma announces the death of former South African President Nelson Mandela in Houghton, Dec. 5, 2013.
    • A man holds candles in front of a mural of former South African President Nelson Mandela and U.S. President Barack Obama in New York, Dec. 5, 2013.
    • Pedestrians pass beneath the Apollo Theater marquee commemorating the life of South African leader Nelson Mandela in the Harlem neighborhood of New York, Dec. 5, 2013.

    “We will spend the week mourning his passing," he said."We will also spend it celebrating a life well-lived, a life that we must all emulate for the betterment of our country and Africa. Long live Madiba.”

    Nelson Mandela

    • 1918 - Born in Transkei, South Africa
    • 1944 - Joined African National Congress
    • 1956 - Charged with treason, later acquitted
    • 1962 - Convicted of sabotage and sentenced to 5 years
    • 1964 - Sentenced to life in prison for plotting to overthrow the government
    • 1990 - Released from prison
    • 1991 - Elected president of ANC
    • 1993 - Won Nobel Peace Prize
    • 1994 - Elected president of South Africa
    • 1999 - Decided not to seek a second term as president
    • 2004 - Retired from public life
    • 2007 - Formed The Elders group
    • 2011 - Briefly hospitalized for a chest infection
    • 2012 - Hospitalized again,this time for gallstones
    • 2013 - Treated for a recurring lung infection, dies on Dec. 5
    The week of events begins this coming Sunday, with a national day of prayer. On Tuesday, the government will hold an official memorial service at a stadium in Johannesburg.  That event is expected to draw massive crowds.

    The White House says President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama will travel to South Africa next week to pay respects to Mandela.
     
    White House press secretary Jay Carney said Friday the Obamas will participate in memorial events, adding that he will announce more details when they become available.

    Every living U.S. president is expected to attend Mr. Mandela's funeral, health permitting.
     
    His body will next lie in state for three days in Pretoria’s Union Buildings, where Mandela worked as South Africa’s first black president. At the same time, South Africa’s provinces will hold their own memorial services.
     
    Mandela’s death has been marked around the world, and many dignitaries and world leaders are expected to converge on South Africa in coming days.
     
    The United Nations held a full minute of silence. U.S. President Barack Obama rushed out of a Hanukah dinner at the White House to call Mandela “one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will ever share time with on this earth.”
     
    Britain’s Prince William, who learned of Mandela’s death at the glitzy London premiere of a Hollywood biopic about Mandela, said the death of the icon was "extremely sad and tragic.”
     
    His grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II - who Mandela called “my friend, Elizabeth” - said she was “deeply saddened.”
     
    Zuma acknowledged the swift and overwhelming international reaction to Mandela’s death.

    “The outpouring of love that we experienced locally and abroad was unprecedented," he said. "It demonstrates the caliber of a leader that Madiba was. We will always love Madiba for teaching us that it is possible to overcome hatred and anger in order to create a new nation and a new society.”
     
    The emotional peak of the next week is expected to come at Tuesday’s ceremony in the Soweto soccer stadium that hosted the first and last games of the World Cup in 2010.
     
    That stadium was also the scene of Mandela’s last public appearance. On the final night of the World Cup, he took to the soccer pitch to wave at the crowd of nearly 85,000 spectators gathered there for the match.
     
    Slowly, the frail, white-haired old man made his way around the field on a little golf cart.  He waved, and smiled - and the entire stadium went wild with joy.

    Interactive Timeline: The Life of Nelson Mandela

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    by: Habut Bottumburp from: South Africa
    December 06, 2013 11:26 AM
    Prior to his presidency, Mandela was incarcerated for 27 years at three different prisons after pleading guilty to 156 acts of public violence, including the Johannesburg railway station bombing.

    He was also a member of the South African Communist Party and a co-founder of Umkhonto we Sizwe, a guerrilla warfare group declared a terrorist organization by the United States in the 1960s.

    by: DORAI RAJ L from: Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu.
    December 06, 2013 10:26 AM
    I pay my tribute to the deceased leader and convey my deep condolence to the bereaved!

    by: Enok Habte from: Dallas, Texas, USA
    December 06, 2013 9:08 AM
    I learned a great deal from Nelson Mandela story, about public service, about patience and perseverance and about making good choices in life. Once he was married & his wife Evelyn became religious, became involved with the Jehova Witness & told him to dedicate his time to the welfare of his OWN young family. No politics OKAY. He would reason, he was serving the Nation, she would reply that serving God was above serving the Nation. She had a valid reason, & he had valid reason. B/cause he oped for the later, he missed out on many of his family & children lives; but now he is leaving behind a lasting global legacy.

    by: Enok Habte from: Dallas, Texas
    December 06, 2013 8:53 AM
    One of the most inspiring individual to ever walk on the face of the earth. Mandela is a hero for mankind. I hope South Africans never forget the impact Mandela had/have on the life of their Nation. Rip Mandela. Long live ANC, & God bless the Rainbow Nation of South Africa. Other African countries, we are proud of South Africa as an exemplary example of success and progress.
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