News / Africa

For Half of South Sudanese, No Clean Water

  • A South Sudanese girl is lifted off the ground as she pumps water at a borehole in Gudere, near Juba. The international community is pumping funds into South Sudan to try to develop its water infrastructure. (VOA/Mugume Davis Rwakaringi)
  • A young South Sudanese woman pumps water at a borehole in Gudere, near Juba, in South Sudan. The South Sudanese capital has grown from population of around 60,000 in 2005 to nearly 400,000 in 2011. The city’s water resources have not been able to keep up.
  • A South Sudanese woman carries plastic jerrycans to collect water in Gudere, near Juba in South Sudan. The country's under-developed infrastructure means that water resources are still strained in most areas. (VOA/Mugume Davis Rwakaringi)
  • A young woman carries a plastic container to collect water in Gudere, near Juba in South Sudan. Only half the population of South Sudan has access to clean water. (VOA/Mugume Davis Rwakaringi)
  • Women who crossed over from Sudan's Blue Nile state with little food or water fill jerry cans at a watering hole called Km 18 on June 20, 2012. Water from watering holes can carry disease. (Hannah McNeish/VOA)
  • A young herder in Kuse Dam in Terekeka county, north of Juba,  uses a pipe filter provided by The Carter Center to strain out infective Guinea worm larvae from water while drinking.
  • Women gather to collect water at the Yusuf Batil refugee camp in Upper Nile, South Sudan, July 4, 2012.
  • Displaced women gather to collect water from a water hole near Jamam refugee camp in South Sudan's Upper Nile State, March 10, 2012.
  • A woman carries water from a water hole near Jamam refugee camp in South Sudan's Upper Nile State, March 10, 2012.
  • A woman waits in a queue to collect water at Yusuf Batil refugee camp, Upper Nile, South Sudan, July 4, 2012.
  • A girl walks through mud to get water at the Yusuf Batil refugee camp in Upper Nile, South Sudan, July 4, 2012.

Only half of the population of South Sudan has access to clean water. Click on the image to see a slideshow. (VOA/Mugume Davis Rwakaringi)

Mugume Davis Rwakaringi
— On World Water Day, Margret Kiden was able to find enough water near her home in Nyakuron East, a Juba suburb, to do her domestic chores – including the laundry for her husband and three kids.

“We face many problems, there is no water here in Juba. It’s normally the water tanks which bring us water. At times, these water tanks are delayed, at times they bring dirty water and at times they don’t come” at all, said Kiden.

The international community is funding several projects around South Sudan to improve access to clean water. But the country’s under-developed infrastructure means that water resources are still strained in most areas.

Only around half the population has access to clean water. In Juba, rapid growth has further strained the water supply. The South Sudanese capital has grown from population of around 60,000 in 2005 to nearly 400,000 in 2011. The city’s water resources have not been able to keep up.

Residents of Juba usually get their water from tankers or from men who push bicycles through the streets with plastic containers, full of water, strapped to both sides.

Any water from the public water works is used exclusively for government buildings, leaving residents to look for other sources, according to a study by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).

JICA has launched a $40 million project to more than double water treatment capacity in Juba.  The project is currently in the drafting stage, but once it is completed, another 350,000 people will have easier access to clean water.

When the three boreholes in Nyakuron East stopped working two years ago, residents were left with only unclean nearby streams, which can carry diseases, or the traveling water tanks as their source of water.

Abale Keji says some residents have turned to another, more expensive solution.

"We buy maybe one or two bottles from a shop to at least cook for the children," Keji says.

A one-and-a-half-liter bottle of water can cost three South Sudanese pounds, slightly less than a dollar -- but exponentially more expensive by volume than the cost of a large tank

On a normal day, Keji needs at least 1,000 liters of water to cook for her family, wash their clothes and bathe. That amount of water is not only hard to come by, it also eats into families' small incomes.

Gross national income in South Sudan in 2011 was $984 per capita, or less than $3 a day.

You May Like

China Investigates Former Powerful Security Chief

Former security chief and member of Politburo Standing Committee, Zhou Yongkang, under investigation for suspected 'serious disciplinary violation' More

India, US Look to Reset Ties During Kerry Visit

This week's talks will be first high level interaction between two countries since Prime Minister Narendra Modi took charge More

Video Young African Leadership Program Renamed to Honor Mandela

YALI program, launched by President Obama in 2010, aims to build skills in business, entrepreneurship, public management and civic leadership More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Machar Hoth Tot from: Bentiu
March 25, 2013 10:40 AM
Water is essential for life, drinking dirty water is sign of no healthy and later will make government spend a lot of money for buying drugs, I am urging the State government to do its best to make sure that the Citizens are drinking clean water

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid