News / USA

Study Shows Shift in US Religious Attitudes

VOA News
A new study shows a significant increase in the number of Americans who say they are not affiliated with a particular religion.
 
The findings of the Pew Research Center indicate nearly 20 percent of all Americans now consider themselves agnostics, atheists or "nothing in particular" when it comes to religious affiliation, a rise from 15 percent five years ago.
 
Researchers say the number of religiously unaffiliated Americans is even higher among younger adults, accounting for 32 percent of those under the age of 30.
 
The study, released Tuesday, could have implications for the presidential race between U.S. President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney, as their campaigns seek to strengthen their appeal to voters ahead of the November election.
 
The study found almost a quarter of registered voters who identify themselves either as Democrats or Democratic "leaning" say they are religiously unaffiliated, a rise from 17 percent five years ago.
 
Among Republican and Republican "leaning" voters, the percentage of those describing themselves as religiously unaffiliated grew from 9 to 11 percent over the past five years.
 
Researchers say the factors behind the increased number of religiously unaffiliated people in America, historically a deeply religious nation, include "generational replacement" — the gradual replacement of older generations by newer ones — and a rise in the number of Americans raised without a religious affiliation.
 
In spite of the increase, researchers say not all of the religiously unaffiliated are strictly secular, with many saying they do believe in God, pray daily or consider themselves "spiritual but not religious."
 
The findings are based on several broad surveys conducted by Pew and the PBS television series "Religion and Ethics Newsweekly."

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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
October 11, 2012 6:21 AM
Too bad for America. In truth of the expectation of the antichrist rising from here, religious leaning of America will even go down at a faster rate than 5yrs. But it is shameful that while leaning toward innocuous religions wanes, the growth of aggressive and destructive "peaceful" ones escalate. It is a failure of the older generation of Americans to give direction to the younger ones. The end result is chaos! No one will be surprised soon to see America remove 'IN GOD WE TRUST' from its constitution.

Less surprising too if America wakes up one morning to declare it illegal to believe in God. It did happen in the medieval and also in USA's parent country England. It's the practice to hound Christians in all of Asia, Middle East and Europe. If it rises again, it'll be history repeating itself. But worse still, it will be the end of the American Empire. It's just the work of the antichrist to use America to achieve its end, and America's acceptance of the destructive role, but everything depends on the same God that America rejects: He will bring the ancient serpent to subjection in due time for the benefit of humanity, not just for America. Righteousness exalts a nation, sin is a reproach to a nation that rejects God.


by: Jeff Kuryk from: Western Canada
October 10, 2012 11:40 AM
Find out what social scientists discovered by exploring the concept of meaning by checking out the YouTube video, "What is the Meaning of Life 101?"


by: Michael from: USA
October 10, 2012 2:53 AM
Giving up a belief based on the belief that such belief is an illusionism is not to say anything about virtue ethics, so this data cannot mean widespread immorality


by: Zado from: AZ
October 09, 2012 3:08 PM
Well, it looks like egonovism is on the rise.

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