News / USA

Tea Party Drives Republican Hardline on Government Funding

Tea Party Drives Republican Hard Line on Government Fundingi
X
October 05, 2013 1:57 PM
A one-page letter - signed by almost one-fifth of the legislators in the U.S. House of Representatives - was a factor leading to a political stalemate and the U.S. government shutdown. Congress and the President cannot agree on continuing to fund the government, with the Republicans determined to undermine the President’s signature healthcare law. As VOA’s Carolyn Presutti tells us, some powerful Republicans say they are bowing to the wishes of their constituents.
A one-page letter - signed by almost one-fifth of the legislators in the U.S. House of Representatives - was a factor leading to a political stalemate and the U.S. government shutdown. Congress and President Barack Obama cannot agree on continuing to fund the government, with the Republicans determined to undermine the president’s signature health care law.  Some powerful Republicans say they are bowing to the wishes of their constituents.

Outside the Capitol, Washington, D.C. is quiet.  Inside, talk is tough. Democrats support the president.

“What have we come to here? We have the best country in the world and it’s time we start running it again,” asked Rep. Peter Visclosky (D-Ind).

“The House has compromised over and over and over again," insisted Rep. Andy Barr (R-Ky).

Ultra-conservative

Republican Congressman Barr belongs to the ultra-conservative arm called the Tea Party.  It arrived on the political scene in 2009.  The movement is now a force within the party.

Eighty members (a third of House Republicans, including Barr) signed a letter connecting a repeal of health care reform to any resolution that keeps the government running.  

Barr accused Democrats of pushing through the health care reform act in 2010 when they had a majority in both houses of Congress, and said his Kentucky constituents did’t like it.

“I cannot ignore the deluge of calls and conversations and communications that I’m getting from constituents talking about Obamacare hurting them, their businesses and their families,” he said.

Anti-Obama

According to the Cook Political Report, most of the 80 Republicans come from districts that voted unlike most of the country.  For example, President Obama only received 38 percent of the vote in Barr’s district.  And while voters nationwide are looking more diverse, the Cook Report said Republican districts are getting whiter.

Moderate Republicans agree that Obamacare should be diminished but oppose the tactics of the Tea Party - like shutting down the government.  Analysts said they were looking over their shoulder, afraid of a Tea Party challenger, if they didn't go along. 

“In the case of Republicans looking over their right shoulders, they may be safe in their districts as Republicans if they were to face a Democrat in an election, but they may not be safe from a primary challenge,” explained John Fortier, of the Bipartisan Policy Center.

Blame game

Meanwhile, Republicans and Democrats accuse each other of refusing to compromise. 

"All we are asking for is to sit down and have a discussion," insisted House Speaker John Boehner.

"Mr. Speaker, You shut down the federal government. But now what?” asked said Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii).

 “It’s part of our polarized world," remarked Fortier. "The extent that we have divided government.  Our parties differ a lot.  It’s likely that part of this is the new normal.”

So for now, the factions wait to see which side blinks first.  Until then, the federal government remains shut down until further notice.

Carolyn Presutti

Carolyn Presutti is an Emmy and Silver World Medal award winning television correspondent who works out of VOA’s Washington headquarters.   She has also won numerous Associated Press awards and a Clarion for her coverage of The Syrian Medical Crisis, Haiti, The Boston Marathon Bombing, Presidential Politics, The Southern Economy, and The 9/11 Bombing Anniversary.  In 2013, Carolyn aired exclusive stories on the Asiana plane crash and was named VOA’s chief reporter with Google Glass.

You can follow Carolyn on Twitter at CarolynVOA, on Google Plus and Facebook.

You May Like

Video 2nd American Reportedly Killed in Syria

Minnesota television report says Abdirahman Muhumed left area to fight for Islamic State militants More

WHO Fears Ebola Outbreak Could Infect 20,000 People

World Health Organization says outbreak 'continues to accelerate' but that most cases are concentrated in a few local areas More

Angelina Jolie Marries Brad Pitt

Actors wed in small private ceremony Saturday in France More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
 Previous    
by: MadMc44 from: Maine
October 05, 2013 1:30 PM
I'm happy to hear all Govt. employees will be reimbursed for the days lost as they don't have a dog in the fight. As I see it the only ones that really care are the Tea Party Repubs. Hopefully they are giving up their pay and not for a charitable deduction on their taxes.
The Affordable Care Act is law boys and girls get over it and get back to work or resign and go home.

     

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Chinese Doctors Use 3-D Spinal Implanti
X
August 27, 2014 4:53 PM
A Chinese boy suffering from a debilitating bone disease has become the first patient with a part of his spine created in a three-dimensional printer. Doctors say he will soon regain normal mobility. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Chinese Doctors Use 3-D Spinal Implant

A Chinese boy suffering from a debilitating bone disease has become the first patient with a part of his spine created in a three-dimensional printer. Doctors say he will soon regain normal mobility. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Uneasy Calm Settles Over Israel, Gaza Strip

Israel and the Gaza Strip have been calm since a cease-fire set in Tuesday evening, ending seven weeks of hostilities. Hamas, which controls Gaza, declared victory. Israelis were more wart. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jerusalem.
Video

Video India’s Leprosy Battle Stymied by Continuing Stigma

Medical advancements in the treatment of leprosy have greatly diminished its impact around the world, largely eliminating the disease from most countries. India made great strides in combating leprosy, but still accounts for a majority of the world’s new cases each year, and the number of newly infected Indians is rising - more than 130,000 recorded last year. Doctors there say the problem has more to do with society than science. VOA News reports from Kolkata.
Video

Video Northern California Quake: No Way to Know When Next One Will Hit

A magnitude 6.0 earthquake rocked northern California’s Napa Valley on Sunday. Roads twisted and water mains burst. It was the wine country’s most severe quake in 15 years, and while hospitals treated many people, no one was killed. Arash Arabasadi has more from Washington on what the future may hold for those residents living on a fault line.
Video

Video Scientists Unlock Mystery of Bird Flocks

How can flocks of birds, schools of fish or herds of antelope suddenly change direction -- all the individuals adjusting their movement in concert, at seemingly the same time? British researchers now have some insights into this behavior, which has puzzled scientists for a long time. VOA's George Putic has more.
Video

Video Ukraine: Captured Troops Proof of Russian Role in Separatist Fight

Ukrainian officials say they have captured Russian soldiers on Ukrainian territory -- the latest accusation of Moscow's involvement in the conflict in eastern Ukraine. VOA's Gabe Joselow reports from the Ukrainian side of the battle, where soldiers are convinced of Russia's role.
Video

Video Rubber May Soon Come From Dandelions

Synthetic rubber has been around for more than a century, but quality tires for cars, trucks and aircraft still need up to 40 percent or more natural rubber content. As the source of natural rubber, the rubber tree, is prone to disease and can be affected by bad weather. So scientists are looking for replacements. And as VOA’s George Putic reports, they may have found one in a ubiquitous weed.
Video

Video Jewish Life in Argentina Reflected in Yiddish Tango

Jewish people from across Europe and Russia have been immigrating to Argentina for hundreds of years. They brought with them dance music that were eventually mixed with Argentine tango. The result is Yiddish tango -- a fusion of melodies and cultural experiences that is still evolving today. Elizabeth Lee reports from the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, where one band is bringing Yiddish tango to an American audience.

AppleAndroid