News

Tibetan Unrest Highlights Rejection of Chinese Development Goals

Stephanie Ho

China has long championed its policies in Tibet as aimed at boosting development and raising living standards in a remote and impoverished region. But, as Tibetan protests and self-immolations continue in some areas, the unrest is a public rejection of those claims of progress.

Tibetans are depicted in official Chinese media as members of a happy minority group with colorful traditions that include singing, dancing and, for nomadic herders, archery. The images support the Chinese government’s claims that living standards are rising and Tibetans are content.

Tanzen Lhundup, with the China Tibetology Research Center, says Beijing's concern for Tibetan people is genuine.

“The government has invested heavily in improving peoples' living conditions, infrastructure in Tibet and education. It has introduced a great number of preferential policies in support of the Tibetan areas. The changes in Tibet and Tibetan areas have been fundamental,” Tanzen Lhundup said.

Although the local economy has grown, so has the sense of desperation among many ethnic Tibetans. In the past year nearly 30 have set themselves on fire - vividly demonstrating that they would rather die than live under Chinese rule.

Many of the recent anti-China protests, like one last week in Qinghai province, involve Buddhist monks, who have long played a central role in Tibetan culture.

“We have no freedom, no religious freedom and not even freedom of speech. The pressure is too great. People have no choice, so we protest,” said one monk in Gansu province, who asked to remain anonymous.

The protests and immolations have led to no notable changes from Beijing.

Lian Xiangmin, also with the China Tibetology Research Center, echoes the government’s view that the protests are artificially manufactured - not linked to actual grievances.

“I think first of all, those who plan such incidents should stop. Two, the Dalai Lama should issue a statement to call for an end to such cases and express his opposition to such behavior. Three, the media should stop playing up such incidents,” Lian Xiangmin said.

In China, the protests go largely unmentioned in state media, which instead focuses on rituals that emphasize Tibet as an inalienable part of Chinese territory.

The Dalai Lama, who remains a potent spiritual and political symbol for Tibetans, has largely refrained from publicly commenting on the immolations.

For both sides, the immolations remain a symptom of a problem that the other refuses to acknowledge.

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
    Next 
by: kevin
March 27, 2012 7:45 PM
Well, i know i can not persuade the foolish people to believe our determination. But, we will keep our independence with will and blood. We love peace, we will not invade Iraq or Afgan like US or British, time will witness that

by: Sam
March 26, 2012 5:49 PM
this is to the guy called "Anti-China Government". Whether the China Government wants the sun, moon and stars or not has nothing to do with if Tibet is part of China or not. Tibet will forever be part of China. The reason is simple-every drop of water in Chinese rivers comes from Tibet. You really think we will let Tibet be independent???? until every drop of Chinese blood runs dry it won't happen.

by: Xing
March 26, 2012 1:51 PM
"Reporter Sethi says protesters gave indications well before Monday's immolation that something unusual was going to happen.
Still, Choedon Lama, regional general secretary for the activist Tibetan Youth Congress, insists the self-immolation was spontaneous."
Thanks VoA. Now you give the truth who are behind the self-immolation.

by: Joel
March 25, 2012 8:45 AM
It's interesting. People complain and argue how China is trying to rid Tibet of its culture, religion, language, identity, etc. but no one ever asks why. The are about 56 other ethnic minorities living in China that seem to live in relative peace. Why not Tibet? I am not saying that I condone China's actions, but there might actually be a little bit more justification for it than the Free Tibet activists are leading to believe.

by: Anti-china government
March 25, 2012 7:30 AM
China gov. does not only want Tibet but also the whole world. Now they aggressively occupy the South East Asian sea and Indian ocean that are not belonging to them historically. They want everything. If possible they also want to own the Moon, the Sun too in order to control the world. They have a term called "the soft border", this means where a Chinese living is the land of China. They are greedy and selfish. The world need to know and be extremely cautious about them all the time.

by: Xing
March 25, 2012 1:37 AM
CCP made a big mistake in 1980s. They sent a party chief called Wu Jinghua to revive the Lama religion in Tibet. Then Dalai Lama become something. Do we really need someone like us to rule us in spirit or even in real life? Is it called democracy and freedom?

by: @M
March 23, 2012 11:26 PM
Tibet is always Chinese territory. I don't know why so many people want to seperate it form China. Maybe they don't want China to become stronger.

by: Leave China alone
March 23, 2012 6:10 PM
Tibetan are Chinese. Nothing can change that. Why do some guys always want to separate them? Actually we do have wrong policy for Dalai Lama. We do not need to care about him. Just learn from US and other weatern countries, keep the traditional culture in some small places. Most of Tibet should live various nationalities and good benefits should be used to attract some Tibetan to live the other provinces.

by: Masa(2)
March 23, 2012 5:12 PM
I less respect China as a state than any other country, no matter how China may reach wonderful economic development and grab hegemony in the world. contemporary China will not gain at all from the world as much respect as past Chinese dynasties did.

by: Masa(1)
March 23, 2012 5:12 PM
In the past, serial dynasties in China used to have good relationships to local minority groups, giving them self-rule.Now, the contemporary Chinese authorities not only rob them of self-rule, but also try to destruct their culture, ethnic identity,and pride.
Comments page of 2
    Next 

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam Wari
X
Katherine Gypson
May 25, 2015 1:32 AM
For many US war veterans, the Memorial Day holiday is an opportunity to look back at a divisive conflict in the nation’s history and to remember those who did not make it home.
Video

Video Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam War

For many US war veterans, the Memorial Day holiday is an opportunity to look back at a divisive conflict in the nation’s history and to remember those who did not make it home.
Video

Video Female American Soldiers: Healing Through Filmmaking

According to the United States Defense Department, there are more than 200-thousand women serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.  Like their male counterparts, females have experiences that can be very traumatic.  VOA's Bernard Shusman tells us about a program that is helping some American women in the military heal through filmmaking.
Video

Video Iowa Family's Sacrifice Shaped US Military Service for Generations

Few places in America have experienced war like Waterloo. This small town in the Midwest state of Iowa became famous during World War II not for what it accomplished, but what it lost. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, the legacy of one family’s sacrifice is still a reminder today of the real cost of war for all families on the homefront.
Video

Video On Film: How Dance Defies Iran's Political Oppression

'Desert Dancer' by filmmaker Richard Raymond is based on the true story of a group of young Iranians, who form an underground dance troupe in the Islamic Republic of Iran. This is the latest in a genre of films that focus on dance as a form of freedom of expression against political oppression and social injustice. VOA’s Penelope Poulou has more.
Video

Video Turkey's Ruling Party Trying to Lure Voters in Opposition Stronghold

Turkey’s AK (Justice and Development) Party is seeking a fourth successive general election victory, with the goal of securing two-thirds of the seats in Parliament to rewrite the constitution and change the country's parliamentary system into a presidential one. To achieve that, the party will need to win seats in opposition strongholds like the western city of Izmir. Dorian Jones reports.
Video

Video Millions Flock to Ethiopia Polls

Millions of Ethiopians cast their votes Sunday in the first national election since the 2012 death of longtime leader Meles Zenawi. Mr. Meles' party, the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front, is almost certain of victory again. VOA's Anita Powell reports from Addis Ababa.
Video

Video Scientists Testing Space Propulsion by Light

Can the sun - the heart of our solar system - power a spacecraft to the edge of our solar system? The answer may come from a just-launched small satellite designed to test the efficiency of solar sail propulsion. Once deployed, its large sail will catch the so-called solar wind and slowly reach what scientists hope to be substantial speed. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video FIFA Trains Somali Referees

As stability returns to the once lawless nation of Somalia, the world football governing body, FIFA, is helping to rebuild the country’s sport sector by training referees as well as its young footballers. Abdulaziz Billow has more from Mogadishu.
Video

Video With US Child Obesity Rates on the Rise, Program Promotes Health Eating

In its fifth year, FoodCorps puts more than 180 young Americans into 500 schools across the United States, where they focus on teaching students about nutrition, engaging them with hands-on activities, and improving their access to healthy foods whether in the cafeteria or the greater community. Aru Pande has more.
Video

Video Virginia Neighborhood Draws People to Nostalgic Main Street

In the U.S., people used to grow up in small towns with a main street lined by family-owned shops and restaurants. Today, however, many main streets are worn down and empty because shoppers have been lured away by shopping malls. But in the Del Ray neighborhood of Alexandria, Virginia, main street is thriving. VOA’s Deborah Block reports it has a nostalgic feel with its small restaurants and unique stores.

VOA Blogs