News / Middle East

UAE Tries 94 for Alleged Coup Plot

Justice monument in front of a mosque in Ras al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates, May 3, 2012.
Justice monument in front of a mosque in Ras al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates, May 3, 2012.
Phillip Walter Wellman
Ninety-four people in Abu Dhabi went on trial Monday, charged with plotting to overthrow the government of the United Arab Emirates.
 
Rights groups, who, along with international media, were prohibited from entering the court, are voicing concern over the fairness of the proceedings, pointing to a number of alleged irregularities.
 
UAE authorities allege the suspects, including two prominent human rights lawyers, doctors, academics and student leaders who were arrested over the last year, formed a secret network with links to the Muslim Brotherhood that aimed to carry out a coup and transform the Gulf state’s relatively liberal society into a strict Islamist regime.
 
Most of the defendants are believed to be part of the local Islamist group al-Islah, which advocates a greater political voice for Emirati citizens.
 
According to rights groups, many of the accused, both men and women, have been denied due process, and some have already been imprisoned for nearly a year.
 
Rori Donaghy of the Britain-based Emirates Center for Human Rights says there is strong evidence that many defendants were subjected to torture, a charge UAE officials deny.
 
"We are absolutely certain that the prisoners have suffered from severe maltreatment while in custody," he said.
 
After the Arab Spring uprisings in 2011, the UAE sentenced five dissidents to prison after they campaigned for a more representative government. They were later pardoned by the president.
 
Theodore Karasik, the director of research at the Dubai-based Institute for Near East and Gulf Military Analysis, says the UAE remains wary of regional unrest spreading to its shores.
 
"What’s important to understand is that the regional environment is creating hostile forces to many different countries in the region, and if the UAE authorities are seeing that there is any kind of sympathy for hostile forces, they’re going to act against them," he said.
 
The UAE is a strong American ally in the Persian Gulf. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is due to visit the capital, Abu Dhabi, this week as part of his first foreign tour as America's top diplomat.

You May Like

VOA Exclusive: Interview With Myanmar President Thein Sein

Thein Sein calls allegations that minority Muslim Rohingya are fleeing alleged torture in Rakhine state a media fabrication More

New Yellow Fever Research May Lead to Improved Treatment

Researchers identify features of disease that may lead to more effective treatment More

UN Rights Commission Investigates Eritrea

Three-member commission will start collecting first-hand information from victims and other witnesses in Switzerland and Italy next week More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Horsesforcourses from: dubai
March 05, 2013 4:13 PM
Quit taxing Emaratis to Muslim Brotherhood whenever the State Security Department run outta intelligence. They ain’t dumb to dole UAE to idiots. Rigged failing UAE Cradle-to-Grave politics and created Unprivileged Debt-Laden Emiratis who prefer trouble to prosperity. UAE stands no chance to face Unprivileged Debt-Laden Emiratis who have nothing to lose. Prison is the birth place of good as Joseph PBUH and evil as Stalin. Since Joseph is dead! Then you’re left Stalin. Who would you choose? Dangerous! KABOOOM! They must ban pot in Supreme Courts also. 10 Uncaptured Emiratis Vigilantes still at-large dogged to overthrow UAE Government. You must be kidding? Their 94 illegal organization members are busted trying and convicted for high treason & 'coup plotters' including 13 women. Have you lost your minds? This is weird. Democracy ain’t child-play for either the Present UAE regime or the Uncaptured Emiratis Vigilantes. It’s a big sacrifice man must take once for good either kapeeesh or kabooom or both. ILLEGAL ORGANIZATION is very foolish description for unlicensed politics – it’s a field-day for SPOILERS not to mention standby Human Right Goons & Amateur Activists to earn their living outta fiddling in UAE internal affairs. I didn’t expect that "The State Security Department of the Federal Supreme Court is so dumb to allow those Vigilantes grow as zeitgeist urban legends abroad in absentia. Unless it is in present regime interest to groom such vigilantes behind bar & the uncaptured ten as licensed activist who will do what they are told to democratize UAE if they have to. It will be smart of The State Security Department of the Federal Supreme Court to let 94 illegal organization members busted go home and forget about everything. Don’t lead wolves home. Focus on what’s coming not what’s going? Arabspring is Tsunami not a summer fog that its fugitive’s loots are boosting UAE economy as we speak. It’s a curse if ain’t tamed now.


by: mohammed from: UAE
March 04, 2013 11:10 PM
it is Arabian gulf not Persian gulf


by: Muhamad from: Saudi Arabia
March 04, 2013 3:42 PM
unfortunately, the naive people of the world think that a confrontation with Iran can be avoided... but, undermining the stability of Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria... in an attempt to establish Shia domination over them is the vow the Iranian Ayatollahs swore before their satanic idols...

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Ebola Economic Toll Stirs W. Africa Food Security Concernsi
X
November 19, 2014 11:39 PM
The World Bank said Wednesday that it expects the economic impact of the Ebola outbreak on the sub-Saharan economy to cost somewhere betweenf $3 billion to $4 billion - well below a previously-outlined worst-case scenario of $32 billion. Some economists, however, paint a gloomier picture - warning that the disruption to regional markets and trading is considerable. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Ebola Economic Toll Stirs W. Africa Food Security Concerns

The World Bank said Wednesday that it expects the economic impact of the Ebola outbreak on the sub-Saharan economy to cost somewhere betweenf $3 billion to $4 billion - well below a previously-outlined worst-case scenario of $32 billion. Some economists, however, paint a gloomier picture - warning that the disruption to regional markets and trading is considerable. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Mexico Protests Escalate Over Disappearances

Protests in Mexico over 43 students missing since September continue to escalate, reflecting growing anger among Mexicans about a political system they view as corrupt, and increasingly tainted by the drug trade. Mounting outrage over the disappearances is now focused on the government of President Enrique Pena Nieto, accused of not doing enough to end insecurity in the country. More from VOA's Victoria Macchi.
Video

Video US Senate Votes Down Controversial Oil Pipeline - For Now

The U.S. Senate has rejected construction of a controversial pipeline to transport Canadian oil to American refineries. The $5 billion project still could be approved next year, but it faces a possible veto by President Barack Obama. As VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, the pipeline has exposed deep divisions in Congress about America’s energy future.
Video

Video Can Minsk Cease-fire Agreement Hold?

Growing tensions between government troops and separatists in eastern Ukraine further threaten a cease-fire agreement reached two months ago in the Belarusian capital of Minsk. Critics of U.S. policy in Ukraine say it is time the Obama administration gives up on that much-violated cease-fire and moves toward a new deal with Russia. VOA's Scott Stearns has more.
Video

Video Chaos, Abuse Defy Solution in Libya

The political and security crisis in Libya is deepening, with competing governments and, according to Amnesty International, widespread human rights violations committed with impunity. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London.
Video

Video US Hosts Record 866,000 Foreign Students

Close to 900,000 international students are studying at American universities and colleges, more than ever before. About half of them come from Asia, mostly China. The United States hosts more foreign students than any other country in the world, and its foreign student population is steadily growing. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video Ferguson Church Grapples with Race Relations

Many white residents of Ferguson, Missouri, say they chose to live there because of the American Midwest community's diversity. So, they were shocked when a white police officer killed an unarmed black teenager in August – and shaken by the resulting protests and violence. Some local churches are leading conversations on how to go forward. VOA’s Ayesha Tanzeem reports.
Video

Video What Jon Stewart Learned About Iran From 'Rosewater'

Jon Stewart, host of the satirical news program "The Daily Show" talks with Saman Arbabi of Voice of America's Persian service about Stewart's directorial debut, "Rosewater."
Video

Video Lebanese Winemakers Thrive Despite War Next Door

In some of the most volatile parts of Lebanon, where a constant flow of refugees crosses the border from Syria, one industry continues to flourish against the odds. Lebanese winemakers say after surviving a brutal civil war in the 1970s and 80s, they can survive anything. Heather Murdock has more for VOA from the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon.
Video

Video China's Rise Closely Watched

China’s role as APEC host this week allowed a rare opportunity for Beijing to showcase its vision for the global economy and the region. But as China’s stature grows, so have tensions with other countries, including the United States. VOA’s Bill Ide in Beijing reports on how China’s rise as a global power is seen among Chinese and Americans.

All About America

AppleAndroid