News / Europe

Ukrainе Anti-Terror Chief: This Is War

  • Pro-Russia protesters storm the governor's business premises in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, May 3, 2014.
  • Pro-Russia protesters storm the governor's business premises in Donetsk, Ukraine, May 3, 2014.
  • Pro-Russian protesters gather to honor fallen comrades during fighting with pro-Ukrainian activists in Odessa on Friday, at the barricades in front of the administration building in Donetsk, Ukraine, May 3, 2014.
  • Russia's presidential human rights ombudsman Vladimir Lukin watches as foreign military observers hug each other following their release in Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, May 3, 2014.
  • Smoke billows from burning tires at a pro-Russian checkpoint with a Donetsk republic flag following an attack by Ukrainian troops in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, May 3, 2014.
  • A protester walks past a burning pro-Russian tent camp near the trade union building in Odessa, Ukraine, May 2, 2014.
  • An injured pro-Russian activist looks on during clashes with supporters of the Kyiv government in the streets of Odessa, Ukriane, May 2, 2014.
  • People wait to be rescued on upper levels of a trade union building in Odessa, Ukraine, May 2, 2014.
  • A pro-Russian separatist guards a checkpoint as tires burn in front of him, near the town of Slovyansk, Ukraine, May 2, 2014.
  • Pro-Russian gunmen listen to instructions from their commander (center) behind barricades in Slovyansk, May 2, 2014.
  • A pro-Russian rebel aims his rifle at a checkpoint near a Ukrainian airbase in Kramatorsk, eastern Ukraine, May 2, 2014.
Latest images from Ukraine
Brian Padden
Ukraine expanded its military offensive Saturday against pro-Russia separatists in the country's chaotic east, where European observers who had been held hostage by militants now have been freed. And there is mourning in Odessa, in southern Ukraine, where more than 42 people died Friday during clashes between the two sides.
 
Ukrainian forces moved into Kramatorsk, a town about 17 kilometers south of Slovyansk, where the offensive began Friday.
 
Vasil Krutov, the head of Ukraine's Anti-Terrorist Center, reported heavy fighting and casualties but could not offer specifics about how many people were killed or wounded. At a news conference in Kyiv, Krutov said the confrontation in Kramatorsk was developing into a protracted military conflict.
 
Unfortunately, he said, Ukrainian forces are facing "a very serious aggressor."
 
"What's happening in Donetsk and across the eastern region is not just a planned short-term action," Krutov told reporters. "It's actually war."
 
A combustible situation
 
Local television showed scenes of armored personnel carriers moving through the town, and the country’s Interior Ministry said Ukrainian forces had retaken the security service headquarters.
 
There also was gunfire reported in Slovyansk, where the military previously encountered fierce resistance from separatist fighters. On Friday, at least nine people were killed there, including two servicemen who died when militants shot down a pair of army helicopters.
 
Krutov said Ukrainian forces have taken command of all roads leading into Slovyansk.
 
He said the main concentration of pro-Russian militants - Krutov calls them "terrorists" - is now in Slovyansk. In addition to surrounding the city, Krutov said forces supporting the Kyiv government had taken complete control of radio and TV towers.
 
Militants who had been holding a group of military observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe freed their 12 captives in Slovyansk. Russian media report the hostages - seven Europeans and five Ukrainians - were released after talks involving an envoy sent by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

But uncertainty remains. A resident of Slovyansk who declined to give his name said separatist forces there were rebuilding their defenses. "At this moment," the man said, "nobody is in control of the checkpoints. Local citizens are building back the barricades."
 
Odessa death toll climbs
 
In Odessa, the number of casualties from a clash Friday between pro-Russian activists and supporters of the Ukrainian government rose to at least 42. Most of those killed were pro-Russian protesters who’d taken refuge in a building that government activists set ablaze.

The incident in Odessa, a key port city on the Black Sea, was the most deadly since the February uprising that that led to the removal of Ukraine's pro-Russia president, Viktor Yanukovych. 

Mourners on Saturday placed flowers near the doors of the charred trade union building. Roughly 2,000 pro-Russian protesters gathered outside, chanting: "Odessa is a Russian city."
 
The current Ukrainian government and the West believe that the Kremlin is supporting separatists who are destabilizing the country ahead of the planned May 25 elections. Moscow said Kyiv and its Western sponsors were provoking the bloodshed and would bear direct responsibility for it.

Some reporting by Reuters
 

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by: Dr. Pseudonym from: USA
May 03, 2014 11:05 AM
President Barack Obama made an embarrassing blunder earlier today during his press conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel when he described the post-coup government of Kiev as “duly elected”.



While Obama himself along with other members of the administration have repeatedly complained about pro-Russian “propaganda” clouding the Ukraine crisis, the President’s characterization of a government that came to power as a direct result of a violent overthrow of the democratically elected Yanukovich administration as “duly elected,” when no democratic vote of any kind took place, is either a huge gaffe or a flagrant act of deception.

Here’s the full quote in context from the transcript (emphasis mine);


“What they cannot accept, understandably, is the notion that they are simply an appendage, an extension of Russia, and that the Kremlin has veto power over decisions made by a duly elected government in Kiev.”

Of course, the government in Kiev is anything but duly elected since it was installed with the aid of the United States itself after a violent uprising that unseated the previous government which actually was duly elected.

The stage was set for the Ukraine revolt to become violent in December when US Assistant Secretary of State for Europe Victoria Nuland announced that the U.S. would invest $5 billion in order to help Ukrainians achieve “a good form of government.”

The true nature of that government was subsequently revealed when leaked phone conversations emerged of Nuland conspiring with US ambassador to Ukraine Geoffrey Pyatt to pick Ukraine’s future puppet leaders, personally recommending Arseniy Yatsenyuk, who soon became interim Prime Minister for the post-coup regime.

Documents also emerged confirming that the Euromaidan uprising was largely financed by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) in concert with numerous American NGOs.

To describe the Kiev government as “duly elected” is almost as silly as saying that North Korea’s Kim Jong-un was voted into office, but not a single member of the press who was at the event picked Obama up on this huge faux pas.

by: melwin from: india
May 03, 2014 10:41 AM
Ukraine enjoy murdering their Own citizen.
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