News / Middle East

US Lawmakers: Aid to Egypt Should Continue - for Now

A supporter of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi in front pictures of Morsi at Nasr City, where protesters have installed their camp and hold their daily rally, in Cairo, Egypt, July 25, 2013.
A supporter of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi in front pictures of Morsi at Nasr City, where protesters have installed their camp and hold their daily rally, in Cairo, Egypt, July 25, 2013.
Michael Bowman
Some U.S. lawmakers say there should be no immediate cut-off of American aid to Egypt following the military ouster of President Mohamed Morsi. The future of that assistance was the focus of a Senate hearing one day after the Obama administration announced a delay in the delivery of F-16 fighter jets to Egypt.

For decades, Egypt has been a top recipient of U.S. foreign aid, including substantial military assistance. The chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Democrat Robert Menendez, says aid should continue to flow, at least for now.

“Abandoning Egypt would be a particularly poor policy choice,” he said.

Similarly, the committee’s top Republican, Senator Bob Corker, argued in favor of soothing tensions between Washington and Cairo.

“I do think that our nation’s role in Egypt right now should be an instrument of calmness. I think sometimes we forget that we have critical national security interests in Egypt," he said. "It is the most populous country in the Middle East, a strategic ally, the recipient of more than $1 billion in U.S. taxpayer money [annually], provides U.S. military vessels preferred access to the Suez Canal, and our two countries cooperate on counterterrorism."

Wednesday, the Pentagon announced a delay in the delivery of four F-16 jets to Egypt. A spokesman said the U.S.-Egyptian military relationship endures, but that the administration desires a return to democratic governance in Egypt as soon as possible.

The Obama administration has not labeled Morsi’s ouster an actual military coup which, under U.S. law, would trigger a cut-off of assistance to Egypt. Such an outcome would be viewed negatively by many Egyptians, according to former U.S. diplomat Dennis Ross, who testified at the Senate hearing.

“I am afraid that if we were to cut off our assistance at this point, the effect would be to lose the link we have with the military. But we would also find a backlash among the Egyptian public," he said. "The Egyptian public would look at this as an American effort to dictate to them against the popular will.”

Another witness said inaction, however, causes the United States to be seen as indifferent or even condoning the removal of a duly-elected leader.

“The United States is understandably wary of damaging its longstanding relationship with the Egyptian government. But it should also avoid pursuing a policy that appears to be cynical and unprincipled,” said former State Department Middle East affairs specialist Michele Dunne.

Menendez emphasized that U.S. goals must remain clear.

“At the end of the day, Egyptian leaders and the Egyptian military must show that they are committed to an inclusive political process, credible democratic elections, and democratic governance that protects the rights of religious minorities and women,” he said.

Menendez warned that U.S. support “is not unconditional and unending.”

  • Morsi supporters say they moved onto the streets in reaction to the massive rallies against the former president in June. (Heather Murdock for VOA)
  • Men spray the hot crowds with cold water from plastic water packs and bottles. Currently fasting for the holy month of Ramadan, no one in this crowd takes a drink. (Heather Murdock for VOA)
  • Fifteen-year-old Abdulrahman Usama has been staying in this tent for nearly a month and says he won't go back to school until the former president is reinstated. (Heather Murdock for VOA)
  • Some people are operating businesses like prickly-pears for sale in crates, but pro-Morsi protesters say most of the people living in this tent village spend the hot days resting, reading Quran, and preparing for rallies. (Heather Murdock for VOA)
  • Emad Zaghlul Mustafa fills bottles with colored sand depicting landscapes. He says he moved into the tent village to protest the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi, but creates art to keep himself busy between rallies. (Heather Murdock for VOA)

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by: GrinOlsson from: Alaska, USA
July 25, 2013 10:13 PM
As an American, I find it scandalous to give one single cent of American tax money to Muslim nations. It's an outrage. Their ideology mixes religion with politics and the United States government is banned from intruding into religious affiliations inside of our boundaries as well as outside of our boundaries. We should disengage from the Middle East, refuse to provide military and financial aid, as well as ban Islamists from receiving visas, residency, or citizenship in the United States. Their fanaticism never ends - and only results in violence. By the way, America only had 100,000 Muslims in 1970 and now we have over 9 million. Who let them in the United States?

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