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Midterm Elections 2010

Midterm Elections 2010
Midterm Elections 2010

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US President Barack Obama speaks at a rally for Democratic Governor Deval Patrick of Massachusetts at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts, October 16, 2010. Jason Joseph (C) holds campaign signs during a get out the vote rally put on by local unions and Democratic politicians on the grounds of the Jackson Memorial hospital on October 18, 2010 in Miami, Florida. People cast their votes at a polling station set up at the Miami-Dade Government Center on October 18, 2010 in Miami, Florida. A man takes a picture from the top of a bus at a sparsely attended rally for the Tea Party Express national tour which kicked off yesterday with a rally in Reno on October 19, 2010 in Ely, Nevada. Politician and conservative activist Sarah Palin prepares to speak at the launch for the Tea Party Express national tour which is kicking off with a rally in Reno on October 18, 2010 in Reno, Nevada.
All photos: AFP
The balance of power tipped towards the Republican Party in Tuesday's key midterm elections in the United States, as voters sent a message of discontent to the Congress and President Barack Obama.  Republicans wrested control of the House of Representatives from the Democrats, but stopped short of capturing the Senate.  

Americans also cast ballots for governors, state lawmakers and other local officials, including mayors.  There were also many local initiatives in states across the country covering taxes, government spending and social issues that were decided on Election Day: one of the most high profile - whether or not to legalize marijuana - was rejected in the state of California.

Some Senate and gubernatorial races remained undecided long after polls closed Tuesday evening.  But the overall message that analysts had predicted heading into the elections was clear: many Americans are frustrated just two years after the historic election of the nation's first African-American president.  Much of that discontent has been driven by a stagnant economy and a persistently high unemployment rate.


Midterms: What Republican gains mean

House of Representatives

Republican John Boehner is expected to become the new speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, after his party won the majority in that chamber in Tuesday's midterm elections.

Boehner delivered an emotional speech Tuesday night as the results were tallied.  He said the American people have sent a message to President Barack Obama that the country needs to change course.  He also said his Republican majority in the House willl stand for a smaller, less costly and more accountable government.

Top Rank

The House speaker is the top-ranking position in the chamber and is elected by members of the party in power.  The speaker helps set the party's legislative agenda and may preside over House debates, in addition to fulfilling regular duties representing his or her congressional district.

If chosen by his party, Boehner will replace Democratic Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  Boehner has been the top-ranking member of the Republican minority in the House since 2006.

Early Notoriety

Boehner was first elected to Congress in 1990, becoming one of a group of seven freshman congressmen who gained notoriety by exposing corruption within the lawmaking body.  He is the sole member of that group still in office.

Boehner quickly became a top adviser of Newt Gingrich, the Republican leader in the House who became speaker when the party took control in 1994. Boehner helped draft and sell the party's Contract With America.

A small business owner from the midwestern state of Ohio, he has led opposition to recent White House initiatives such as health care reform, stimulus spending, and cap-and-trade emissions control policy.  His official biography says he prioritizes education reform and elimination of wasteful spending.

The Next House Speaker?

President Barack Obama repeatedly singled out Boehner in a September economic speech, bringing his name to national attention.  The president said the minority leader and his party have "no new ideas" and would return the country to tax cuts and corporate loopholes that the White House blames for the financial crisis.

Boehner's selection as House speaker is not automatic.  House members must vote for their new leadership after all take their seats in January.  Democrats will vote for their top-ranked position: House minority leader.

Foreign Policy

The new balance of power in the U.S. Congress could have a significant impact on international issues now that the House of Representatives has a Republican majority and Senate Democrats have lost several seats.

Afghanistan

President Barack Obama has said he would like to begin withdrawing U.S. forces from Afghanistan by the middle of next year, if battlefield conditions allow.  Analysts say more Republicans in Congress could lead to greater support for the Afghan war in the short term.  It could also create conflict if Democrats press for the beginning of a withdrawal next year.

Terrorism

The Republican agenda also includes a pledge to remain tough on terrorism and to press for a more comprehensive missile defense system.  Republican gains in the House and Senate could also lend weight to critics' charges that the president has not been tough enough on Iran and its potential development of a nuclear weapon.

Russia, China

The Republican gains may also allow conservatives to press Mr. Obama to be more assertive on disagreements with Russia and China.  They could complicate efforts to ratify a new strategic arms reduction treaty (the START-ONE treaty) with Russia that expired last year.  Critics say its ratification would weaken U.S. defenses, a notion Mr. Obama and Senate Democrats reject.





Why This Election Matters: For the Congressional vote, the midterms were a referendum on President Barack Obama, who began his term two years ago with control of both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Can a person who was not born in the US be elected to Congress ?

(Hit Control A on your keyboard to see the answer)
Answer - Yes, but you must have held US citizenship for 7 years




Previous Trivia Questions

Why is the November 2 election called Midterm?     Answer: Because it takes place in the middle of the president's term in office

How Many Times Can a US Congressman Be Re-Elected ?       Answer: There is no limit


How Many Times Can a US Senator Be Re-Elected?     Answer: There is no limit


US Votes 2010 Midterm Election Program
Watch: Global impact of elections - Live webcast event


How do foreign students living in the US view the midterm election?

Obama Warns Against Voter Apathy in November Elections
Watch: Live 2-hour election night special

Conservative Tea Party Movement Shapes Election Landscape
What is the "Tea Party" and how is it impacting US politics?


More Election News

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