News

US Outlines Plan to Regulate Carbon Gas Emissions

US Environmental Protection Agency chief Lisa Jackson calls her agency's decision to regulate carbon gas emissions in US is an attempt to boost ongoing US congressional efforts dealing with global warming

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has unveiled a strategy for cutting U.S. carbon gas emissions that emphasizes cooperation between the Obama administration and the U.S. Congress.

EPA chief Lisa Jackson outlined the plan Wednesday at a U.N. climate conference in Copenhagen. 

She described her agency's decision this week to regulate carbon gas emissions in the United States as an attempt to boost ongoing U.S. congressional efforts dealing with global warming. 

U.S. Senate debate is stalled on legislation imposing specific cuts on greenhouse gas emissions.  But Jackson said the Obama administration is ready to work closely with lawmakers to pass comprehensive clean energy reforms lowering carbon emissions by more than 80 percent from current levels by mid-century.

The EPA ruled Monday that scientific evidence shows carbon emissions are a clear threat to Americans' health and should be regulated.

That decision gives the agency the power to regulate such emissions without Congressional approval.

The EPA decision was greeted warmly in Copenhagen, where delegates from 192 nations are seeking a deal to place caps on greenhouse gas emissions that many scientists say cause global warming. 

Negotiators are struggling to balance the economic concerns of rich countries with those of developing economies.  Poorer countries are demanding that industrialized economies bankroll the bulk of anti-pollution initiatives because such countries are believed to be responsible for the carbon gas linked to global warming. 

More than 100 world leaders, including U.S. President Barack Obama, are expected to attend the Copenhagen conference next week.

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Story

FILE - Australian Immigration Minister Scott Morrison signs a document together with Cambodian Interior Minister Sar Kheng on a deal for the resettlement of refugees, at the Interior Ministry in Phnom Penh, Sept. 26, 2014.

Australia-Cambodia Resettlement Agreement Raises Concerns

Agreement calls for Cambodia to accept refugees in return for $35 million in aid and reflects Australia’s harder line approach towards asylum seekers and refugees More