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US, Pakistan Talks Fail

The talks failed to yield a remedy to the damage caused by a U.S. airstrike in November that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers on the Afghanistan border.

A prominent U.S. newspaper says high-level talks designed to end a diplomatic deadlock between the U.S. and Pakistan have ended in failure because Pakistan has demanded an unconditional apology from Washington for an airstrike.

The New York Times
says Marc Grossman, the U.S. special envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan, left Islamabad Friday night after two days of discussion.  The talks failed to yield a remedy to the damage caused by a U.S. airstrike in November that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers on the Afghanistan border.

The U.S. has refused to apologize for the strike and Pakistan has retaliated by cutting off NATO supply routes to Afghanistan. The two countries disagree about the sequence of events in the deadliest single cross-border attack of the 10-year war in Afghanistan.

The Times say the U.S. was "seriously debating" whether to say "I'm sorry" to Pakistan, until April 15, when multiple, simultaneous attacks struck Kabul and other Afghan cities.  U.S. military and intelligence officials say the attacks came from the Haqqani network, a terrorist group based in Pakistan's tribal belt in North Waziristan.   

The New York Times said the attacks "swung the raging debate" on whether U.S. President Barack Obama or another senior U.S. official should go beyond the expression of regret Washington has already given, or apologize.

Pakistani officials say they cannot re-open the NATO supply routes into Afghanistan without an apology. In return, the U.S. is withholding as much as $3 billion of promised military aid.

The newspaper says the continuing deadlock "does not bode well" for Pakistan's attendance at a NATO meeting in Chicago in three weeks, assuming it is even invited.  

The New York Times reports U.S. administration officials said Friday the stalemate would not be resolved quickly.

Some information for this report was provided by AFP.

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by: Mike
April 29, 2012 8:21 AM
Just keep-up the air strikes for now. No money to the Pakistani regime. Once they have milked the incident for all its political value they will come-around. They always have. If we encourage the Chinese to step-in, that will anger India, who will then take the focus off of the U.S. Let India and Pakistan scrap with each other. That will bring Pakistan back to the table.


by: Haron
April 29, 2012 4:06 AM
Pakistan wasn't, Isn't & would not be friend for anyone in the world. this is a big mistake that America spent Trillion of Trillions dollars after it's independent history & America builded their schools, universities, hospitals & all humans facilities requirments like, Electronic, Weaponaire equipments & standed Pakistan to recognize as a country to world. but today Pakistan is recognize as a problem country for humantarian.


by: RUSS
April 28, 2012 7:26 PM
Pakistani officials say they cannot re-open the NATO supply routes,The U.S. Government officials say they cannot give Pakistan (terrorist group) $3 Billion dollars in military aid to Kill our Troops and Nato troops, The hell with them. Let them enjoy Shara Law instead of FREEDOM !!


by: Russ
April 28, 2012 4:15 PM
The U.S.A alreadly apologized for the unfortunate mistake on the Pakistani troops,There demands basiclly ties the hands and feet of our troops,and our government. We should take it for a lost,and move on!! It seems to me that the Pakistanis do not want or need DEMOCRACY and FREEDOM !! Let them suck on Shara Law, So, So Sad.We should use the $3 Billion dollars on a Country that wants to get rid of Terrorist Groups, Not Sleep With Them. Let China give them the $3 Billion dollars,

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