News / USA

US Religious Diversity Prompts Increase In Interfaith Marriage

TEXT SIZE - +

This weekend, a congregation of intermarried Jews and Christians in suburban Washington will observe Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement. The Interfaith Families Project is one of a small but growing number of communities that are trying to be true to both Christian and Jewish traditions.

During the rest of the year, they meet on Sunday mornings in a high school in Kensington, Maryland.

A rabbi and a pastor, backed up by a group of musicians, lead them in the the "Shema" - the Jewish statement of faith in one God - and the Christian Lord's Prayer. On a recent Sunday, they interspersed that prayer mix with Beatles songs.

Religion researchers estimate that one third to one half of all marriages in the United States are between members of different faiths. Some say that is a sign of increased religious flexibility and tolerance in the United States, while others warn that Americans' religiosity is being diluted. The debate is particularly strong among Jews, who are intermarrying faster than other faiths.

After the prayer service, the children go into classrooms, to learn about both Christianity and Judaism.

Cindy Porhoryles teaches the third class class. She is a Roman Catholic whose husband is Jewish.

"We really try to honor both traditions - both sets of rituals, if you want to call it that - and the foundation of both religions," she said.

Critics say Judaism and Christianity cannot be coherently combined because of their fundamental disagreement over the Christian belief that Jesus was the son of God. Many parents here are devoted to their own faiths, and worried their children would not be accepted by either of their religions.

Angela Whitehead Quigley was also raised Catholic and fell in love with a Jewish man while in university.

"Neither one of us was going to convert," she said. "We both felt very strongly about our own faiths, and so we were really trying to find a place where we felt home and that's what we found here."

"Part of what I loved about her from day one was her Christianity," said her now-husband, David Quigley. "I assume part of what she loved about me from Day One was the faith I had, the Jewish background."

Universities are one of the most common places for interfaith dating.

Chester Gillis is dean of Georgetown University's divinity school and a professor of theology. He is writing a book that he hopes will show interfaith couples how to harmonize their belief in God, to help them face the other obstacles.

"If you marry someone from your own community, there's a common sympathy and understanding, tradition, a culture, social events, family events, that you're just familiar with," he said. "When you marry outside of that you may not be familiar with those at all. It may be your first time celebrating Easter, or your first time celebrating Passover, or your first time celebrating Eid.'"

A study published last year by religion scholars David Campbell of the University of Notre Dame and Robert Putnam of Harvard University found that one third to one half of all marriages in the United States are interfaith.

Gillis says religion is more diverse in the U.S. than any other country in the world. People are increasingly socializing outside their own faith circles. And recent waves of immigration have brought new groups of Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists and others.

Religious leaders are under pressure to accept intermarried couples into their churches, synagogues, mosques and temples. Gillis says the biggest challenge so far has been for Jews.

"There's a fierce debate within Judaism as to whether this is a good phenomenon or not," the theology professor said. "Some, like the Harvard Lawyer Alan Dershowitz, argue that, 'This is the end of anti-Semitism. This is acceptance in the common culture. This is very good for Jews.' And others argue - particularly in the Orthodox community and sometimes in the conservative Jewish community - 'No, this is the demise of Judaism.'"

After school, 7-year-old Hannah Quigley shows her father how she wrote the words Rosh Hashanah - the Jewish New Year - in Hebrew letters. 

"This is shin," she said.
"Right. Good. Good!" David Quigley answered.
"And this is hey," said Hannah.

Then she shows her mother her artwork.

"So this is Santa Claus. And this is what?" Angela Whitehead Quigley asked.
"A Christmas tree."

Eli Kane, a 17-year old graduate of the school, works as a volunteer to help with the younger children.

He says dual-faith education taught him to appreciate both religions.  

"I like the open-mindedness of Judaism," he said, "but I guess I respect the deep belief of Christianity."

Asked what he considers himself, he said: "To me interfaith is its own thing, and I identify with interfaith."


Jerome Socolovsky

Jerome Socolovsky is the award-winning religion correspondent for the Voice of America, based in Washington. He reports on the rapidly changing faith landscape of the United States, including interfaith issues, secularization and non-affiliation trends and the growth of immigrant congregations.

You May Like

Multimedia Relatives of South Korean Ferry Victims Fire at Authorities

46 people are confirmed dead, but some 250 remain trapped inside sunken ferry More

War Legacy Haunts Vietnam, US Relations

$84 million project aims to clean up soil contaminated by Agent Orange More

Wikipedia Proves Useful for Tracking Flu

Technique gave better results than Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Google’s Flu Trends More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politicsi
X
Michael Eckels
April 19, 2014
There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politics

There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Face of American Farmer is Changing

The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Donetsk Governor: Ukraine Military Assault 'Delicate But Necessary'

Around a dozen state buildings in eastern Ukraine remain in the hands of pro-Russian protesters who are demanding a referendum on self-rule. The governor of the whole Donetsk region is among those forced out by the protesters. He spoke to VOA's Henry Ridgwell from his temporary new office in Donetsk city.
Video

Video Drones May Soon Send Data From High Seas

Drones are usually associated with unmanned flying vehicles, but autonomous watercraft are also becoming useful tools for jobs ranging from scientific exploration to law enforcement to searching for a missing airliner in the Indian Ocean. VOA’s George Putic reports on sea-faring drones.
Video

Video New Earth-Size Planet Found

Not too big, not too small. Not too hot, not too cold. A newly discovered planet looks just right for life as we know it, according to an international group of astronomers. VOA’s Steve Baragona has more.
Video

Video Copts in Diaspora Worry About Future in Egypt

Around 10 percent of Egypt’s population belong to the Coptic faith, making them the largest Christian minority in the Middle East. But they have become targets of violence since the revolution three years ago. With elections scheduled for May and the struggle between the Egyptian military and Islamists continuing, many Copts abroad are deeply worried about the future of their ancient church. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky visited a Coptic church outside Washington DC.
Video

Video Critics Say Venezuelan Protests Test Limits of Military's Support

During the two months of deadly anti-government protests that have rocked the oil-rich nation of Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has accused the opposition of trying to initiate a coup. Though a small number of military officers have been arrested for allegedly plotting against the government, VOA’s Brian Padden reports the leadership of the armed forces continues to support the president, at least for now.
Video

Video More Millenials Unplug to Embrace Board Games

A big new trend in the U.S. toy industry has more consumers switching off their high-tech gadgets to play with classic toys, like board games. This is especially true among the so-called millenial generation - those born in the 1980's and 90's. Elizabeth Lee has more from an unusual café in Los Angeles, where the new trend is popular and business is booming.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
AppleAndroid