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Rescuers Dig for Survivors After Deadly US Tornado

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More stormy weather is interfering with rescue efforts in Moore, Oklahoma, the day after a monster tornado destroyed large parts of the central U.S. town.

Moore's fire chief says emergency workers will not stop searching for survivors, saying they will go through the rubble of each building at least three times.

Monday's tornado killed 24 people and injured 240. It was a large and powerful storm, measuring as an F-4 on a scale of five. Top measured winds hit 306 kilometers per hour.

The storm tore up entire neighborhoods, leaving the landscape unrecognizable even to those who lived in Moore their whole lives. Many people lost everything they owned, including pets. Quick-thinking teachers are credited with saving lives at an elementary school by hustling students into closets seconds before the storm demolished the building.

President Barack Obama has declared a major disaster in Oklahoma. He ordered the Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide any assistance the state needs. He said the people of Moore are not standing alone as they recover and rebuild.



Moore is a suburb of the state capital, Oklahoma City. An even more powerful tornado struck the town in 1999.

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