News / Middle East

US Voices 'Horror' over NYT Syria Execution Photo

This image made from amateur video released by Tabshoor1 and accessed July 31, 2012, purports to show Free Syrian Army soldiers executing Assad loyalists in Aleppo, Syria.  THE ASSOCIATED PRESS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT,
This image made from amateur video released by Tabshoor1 and accessed July 31, 2012, purports to show Free Syrian Army soldiers executing Assad loyalists in Aleppo, Syria. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT,
VOA News
Images of Syrian rebels executing seven government soldiers displayed the violence of the Syrian civil war Thursday as world leaders met for summit talks in Russia, with no sign they have reconciled their differences over that Middle East conflict.
 
The U.S. State Department said it was "horrified" by video and photographic images published by The New York Times. The influential newspaper identified the leader of the execution squad and reported he ordered the videotaping last year to drum up support for the rebel cause.
 
There was no official comment on the grisly images in St. Petersburg, where the Group of 20 nations met for their annual economic summit. U.S. President Barack Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin, who are at odds over how to respond to the carnage in Syria, greeted each other as the summit began, but there were no reported private contacts between them.
 
At the State Department in Washington, spokeswoman Jan Psaki condemned summary executions by any party to the Syrian conflict. She did not dispute the newspaper account that said the killings documented executions carried out in April, but said U.S. authorities are seeking more information.

The newspaper has since issued a correction, noting the incident took place in 2012, not this past April.
 
The video showed prisoners crouching in front of their captors. They were stripped to the waist and their backs were covered with red welts.
 
The seven pressed their faces into the dirt as the rebel commander recited what was described as a revolutionary verse. About 24 gunshots followed, and the victims' bodies were thrown into a well.
 
In St. Petersburg, President Obama is seeking support for military strikes against Syria's government for its widely reported use of chemical weapons last month.
 
Putin supports the Syrian government's contrary account of the poison-gas attacks near Damascus that are said to have killed more than 1,400 people. The Assad regime and its supporters in the Kremlin contend it was rebels who used illegal chemical weapons, firing at government troops.
 
The Russian president has warned that military strikes such as those Obama is proposing would be unacceptable "aggression" against Syria if they are not authorized by the United Nations. Russia has blocked previous efforts by the Security Council to act against Syria for its tactics in the civil war, which is now in its third year. But Putin says he would support a strike if there was "convincing" proof that Damascus used chemical weapons.
 
Russia and China both have cast vetoes at the Security Council to defeat Western efforts to hold Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's government responsible for the wholesale slaughter of civilians caught up in the conflict.
 
At the U.N., where American officials hosted briefings on the events in Syria, U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power said Russia is holding the world body hostage and shirking its international responsibilities.
 
“There is nothing in the pattern of our interactions with our colleagues in the Security Council, our Russian colleagues, that would give us any reason to be optimistic. And, indeed, we have seen nothing in President Putin’s comments that suggests there is an available path forward at the Security Council,” said Power.
 
Lawmakers in the U.S. Senate could begin debate next week on a measure calling for limited military strikes on Syria.  A key Senate panel on Wednesday approved the draft resolution, which also rules out deploying U.S. ground troops to the country.

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