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    War Games Begin Amid China-Philippines Tension

    Protesters clash with riot police and U.S. Embassy guards as the former rush towards the embassy gates to protest the joint U.S.-Philippines military exercises dubbed "Balikatan 2011," which opened in Manila, Philippines, April 5, 2011.
    Protesters clash with riot police and U.S. Embassy guards as the former rush towards the embassy gates to protest the joint U.S.-Philippines military exercises dubbed "Balikatan 2011," which opened in Manila, Philippines, April 5, 2011.
    Simone Orendain

    U.S. troops are in the Philippines this month for the 28th annual exercises that will include war games in the South China Sea. Close to 8,000 troops from both countries are scheduled to participate. This year's drills are scheduled to take place in three locations including Palawan, a nearly 600-kilometer-long island bordering the Sea and come amid heightened tensions between the Philippines and China over a disputed island chain.

    Restricted areas

    Army spokesman Major Emmanuel Garcia says all activities will be restricted to areas clearly under Philippine sovereignty.

    “These exercises will be done near shore of the Palawan group of islands," Garcia explained.  "There is no way that we will conduct these kinds of military exercises on contested, or on waters that are not ours.  Clearly all exercises will be done on Philippine territory."

    China claims practically the entire South China Sea as its territory, based on old maps.  That has put it in conflict with other countries bordering the sea, a rich fishing ground and potential source of major oil and gas reserves. China also accuses the United States of emboldening other claimants to the sea through actions such as the coming military exercise.  

    Numerous times in the past year, the Philippines has complained of Chinese vessels interfering with activities within Manila's exclusive economic zone, which extends for 370 kilometers from its coastline under international law. China has repeatedly insisted it was acting legally within its own waters.

    Clear message


    That means this year’s military exercises will not be perceived as routine, according to Carl Thayer who specializes in security in Southeast Asia at the University of New South Wales.  He notes the drills are always choreographed to make sure they stay out of disputed waters.

    “But nonetheless they send a clear message of the Philippines building up military capability, the U.S. willing to support the Philippines and [being] a deterrent to China," Thayer noted.  "That it can see a country, which in the past, was kind of a pushover militarily.  It’s still a weakling, but it’s developing strength and that China’s behavior is pushing at least the Aquino administration more and more into asking for greater American, more frequent American presence."

    Last month, Philippine President Benigno Aquino said the country is open to U.S. troops stopping here more often. The welcoming message comes at a time when the U.S defense agenda is shifting toward Asia.

    Beneficial partnership

    Rommel Banlaoi says the U.S. also benefits from the partnership.  Banlaoi is executive director of the Philippine Institute for Peace, Terrorism and Violence Research.

    “The Philippines is a democracy, and having a democracy ally in Asia is good for the United States in terms of democracy promotion in the world," he said. "Secondly, by having a very good relationship with the Philippines, the United States is also able to continue projecting its influence in Southeast Asia.”  

    Apart from the high-profile military exercise, the United States is helping the Philippines acquire affordable military hardware. In August, Manila augmented its tiny naval fleet with a previously U.S.-owned Hamilton class cutter, the BRP Gregorio Del Pilar, and it expects to take possession of another this year.

    The Philippines has also received promises of support from U.S. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton and ranking U.S. senators who visited early this year.

    “Those commitments could imply that the United States would indeed be certain to come to the Philippine defense if they get into a dust-up with the Chinese over a territorial dispute,” said Patrick Cronin, senior director of the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for New American Security.

    “And while a Philippine-US alliance does indeed promise that the United States will come to the defense of the Philippines in general, it doesn’t necessarily imply that it follows in all of the gray areas and disputed areas,"  he added. "Especially in the maritime boundaries.”

    Neutrality

    Cronin reiterates what the U.S. has stated repeatedly, that it will remain neutral when it comes to territorial disputes in the South China Sea.

    Furthermore, Thayer says the Philippines will have to demonstrate that it can take responsibility for its own defense.

    “The United States is looking for allies and strategic partners to carry more of the heavy lifting at a time of budget cuts.  So the more Philippine ships patrol the waters and the U.S. can assist in what’s called maritime domain awareness, the more the Philippines can assert its own sovereignty, first,” he said.

    A spokesman for the Chinese embassy in Manila says China’s response to the joint military exercises is that it hopes the countries concerned can do more for peace and stability in the region.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments page of 3
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    by: Greedy Chinese
    April 20, 2012 9:01 AM
    This greedy chinese are filthy! Stealing other country's land which is clearly within the EEZ of the Ph. Wherever the rich land is, China will claim it. I suggest Taiwan, Philippines, Japan, Vietnam and Malaysia will all sign a pact and drive all that greedy Chinese from the West Philippine Sea.

    by: jimbobjones
    April 19, 2012 7:44 AM
    Ph@@k china. a bunch of thieving liars. always stealing from others, and no morals to think of. All they do is export their inferior products and poisoned food products to an unsuspecting world. The world is beginning to see what china is really like, and it's definitely not good.

    by: China will fall on its greed
    April 17, 2012 9:53 PM
    Jonathan Huang is a Chinese. He is the living proof of a greedy Chinese. Living in Canada does not make him a better person or open up his mind. How's sad! I don't think the majority of Chinese is like him. They just can not speak up because of the China has a good record of free speech. Long live to a China that does not bully its neighbors.

    by: Le
    April 15, 2012 6:02 AM
    Jonathan Huang, the same as many mainland Chinese.
    Stop claiming the ownership wrongly and unreasonably the Asian Sea. Your mainland Chinese are always very greedy, aggressive and invading attitude. whichever areas you want then you say that these are Chinese territories for thousands of years. So nonsense, lies and thick face. Let see if China can continue to rob and steal the others or not.

    by: Jonathan Huang
    April 14, 2012 6:34 AM
    Those islands in South China sea might not all have Chinese live on them, but they were using by Chinese fishermen for thousand years. There are thousands island in North Canada are inhabited, can Chinese just go take them and declare sovereignty over them? South China sea belongs to China, Viet and phils thieves get away!

    by: Cả Thộn
    April 14, 2012 6:29 AM
    1.3 billion hungry Chinese badly need sea food and oil and gas. They do or die for those that is why they have acted like sea pirates to all neighbours Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Philippines, Palau.....The world fails to stop Chinese now will face big war later on.

    by: Jonathan Huang
    April 14, 2012 6:28 AM
    The South China sea are Chinese territories for thousands of years and China had the legal rights to defend their territory & subjects.The Phil might have set foot on the islands but it was China who has first set up a consistent administration over the islands, we have the territory map to show our authority and the biggest island, Taiping island is still under control of Chinese and is the capital of all south China sea territory.

    by: @Jonathan Huang
    April 13, 2012 11:13 PM
    The Falklands are British territories for hundreds of years and Britain had the legal rights to defend their territory & subjects.The Spanish might have first set foot on the islands but it was Britain who has first set up a consistent administration over the islands.The difference is China has been trying to invade & seize by military force the SEA islands from their neighbours.China is neo-colonialist:Evil

    by: @chinese from southeast asia
    April 13, 2012 5:42 PM
    How can anyone deal with china directly when they r known to be unfair and sneaky. They never do what they say. Why can't the dispute go to a third party and plead their case . What r the chinese afraid of? TRUTH

    by: G. Tomhsly
    April 13, 2012 5:06 PM
    The Phils have been an US ally since WWII. It has its own goverment and the US respect that. From the WWII history hundred of thousand of Filipino along with US died fighting the Japs. War is ugly but if the worst of circumstances ever happen , this brothers are worthy allies.
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