Asia

    • South Korea's president-elect Park Geun-hye, center, poses with an official certificate stating her election victory, Seoul, December 20, 2012.
    • South Korea's president-elect Park Geun-hye bows in front of the grave of her father Park Chung-hee, the country's former dictator, at the National Cemetery in Seoul, December 20, 2012.
    • Park Geun-hye of the ruling Saenuri Party waves to her supporters near the party's head office in Seoul, December 19, 2012.
    • Supporters of Park Geun-hye cheer near her Saenuri Party's head office in Seoul, December 19, 2012.
    • South Korean opposition Democratic United Party's presidential candidate Moon Jae-in, second from left, shakes hands with supporters after he cast his ballot in the presidential election in Seoul, December 19, 2012.
    • Members of opposition Democratic United Party watch TV news reporting exit polls on their presidential candidate Moon Jae-in in South Korea's presidential elections, Seoul, December 19, 2012.
    • A South Korean woman with her son, tries to come out from a booth at a polling station in Seoul, December 19, 2012.
    • South Korean National Election Commission officials sort out ballots cast in the presidential election as they begin the counting process in Seoul, December 19, 2012.

    Park Wins South Korean Election

    Published December 19, 2012

    Park Geun-hye has won South Korea's presidential election, becoming the country's first ever female leader.


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