Americas

    • Venezuelan presidential candidate Nicolas Maduro and his wife Cilia Flores celebrate after the official results gave him a victory in the balloting, Caracas, April 14, 2013.
    • Venezuela's opposition leader Henrique Capriles waves to supporters after a news conference at his campaign headquarters in Caracas, April 15, 2013.
    • A supporter of Nicolas Maduro holds a banner with an image of late President Hugo Chavez as he celebrates after the official results gave Mr. Maduro a victory in the balloting, in San Salvador, April 14, 2013.
    • Government supporters celebrate after results of the presidential elections were announced at the Miraflores Palace in Caracas, April 15, 2013.
    • Opposition supporters react as they hear the official presidential elections results in Caracas, April 15, 2013.
    • Chavista militants and soldiers try to calm government supporters as opposition supporters take cover outside a polling station, Caracas, April 14, 2013.
    • A polling station delegate writes down counted votes on a board at the San Francisco de Sales school in Caracas, April 14, 2013.
    • Venezuela's interim president Nicolas Maduro gestures to supporters as he leaves a polling station in Caracas, April 14, 2013.

    Maduro Declared Victor of Venezuelan Presidential Election

    Published April 15, 2013

    Nicolas Maduro, Venezuela's acting president, has eked out a surprisingly narrow victory in Sunday's special election to succeed his late predecessor, Hugo Chavez.


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