Africa

    • Bronwyn Lace’s suspended horse skeleton in a gallery in Johannesburg (Photo: B. Lace)
    • Bronwyn Lace, whose art is described as “beautiful” and “magical” (Photo: B. Lace)
    • The artist enjoys working with monofilament fishing line, which she used here to suspend thousands of fishing flies (Photo: B. Lace)
    • Lace also secured pieces of glass from a church window using fishing line (Photo: B. Lace)
    • She says she loves the way that light interacts with fishing line, saying it adds substance and meaning to her works (Photo: B. Lace)
    • Another view of Lace’s suspended horse skeleton (Photo: B. Lace)
    • Once again she used fishing line to hang the bones of the horse to form what some viewers saw as a mythical, prehistoric creature (Photo: B. Lace)
    • People wander through a Lace exhibition at a gallery in Johannesburg (Photo: B. Lace)

    Life and Death Drive ‘Magic’ of South African artist Bronwyn Lace

    Darren Taylor

    Published September 13, 2013

    Insects embossed in paper, thousands of feathered fishing flies in ceiling-high columns, the skeleton of a horse suspended to suggest a prehistoric or alien creature, rhino bones in the shape of a snake eating its own tail … South African artist Bronwyn Lace often uses bizarre materials to realize her fantasies. To view her work is to become part of a magical world where art and physics merge and structure and form decompose to offer wondrous insights into life and death, order and chaos.


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