Europe

    • The stalacpipe organ in Luray Caverns in Virginia pounds stalactites with electronically-controlled rubber mallets to produce its music. (Trevor Cox)
    • The World War II abandoned oil storage tanks in Inchindown, Scotland was the test site for the world’s longest echo. (RCAHMS)
    • A spot under archways at Grand Central Station in New York reflects the sound from the walls to the opposite side of the underpass and is called the Whispering Gallery.
    • The Mayan Pyramid at Chichen Itza, Mexico creates a chirp like the sacred quetzal bird if you clap your hands while descending the stairs.
    • Bitterns are shy, but have the loudest voice in the wetland. (Creative Commons)
    • A sound engineer sets up to record the singing sand dunes in the Mohave Desert, California. (Trevor Cox)
    • The grooves in this highway in Lancaster, California play an out-of-tune William Tell Overture. (Trevor Cox)
    • A sign welcomes tourists to the musical highway in Lancaster, California. (Trevor Cox )

    Sonic Adventure

    Published March 28, 2014

    Our planet is speaking to us, if we would just stop and listen, says Trevor Cox, an acoustic engineer at the University of Salford in England.


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