Americas

  • Commuters wait for the train at the Estacao da Se subway station in downtown Sao Paulo. Subway workers suspended a strike on Monday that crippled traffic in Brazil's largest city, but warned they could resume their walkout on Thursday, when Sao Paulo hosts the first game of the World Cup, June 10, 2014.
  • Flip-flops printed with the national flags of soccer teams are sold in a sports shop, in Rio de Janeiro, June 10, 2014.
  • In a beachside parking area, a van contains a stockpile of coconuts, in Recife, June 11, 2014.
  • A building in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, June 11, 2014.
  • Armed Brazilian soldiers are deployed to provide security at the Corinthians arena, Sao Paulo, June 11, 2014.
  • Reginaldo, a Brazilian flag seller, waits for customers sitting in traffic just days before the 2014 World Cup events begin, Cuiaba, June 10, 2014.
  • Germany's national soccer team members wave as they are transported to the sailing ship 'Pangaea' near Santo Andre village, near Porto Seguro, Brazil, June 10, 2014.
  • The Obelisk is lit up in the Brazilian team colors of yellow and green in Buenos Aires. On the eve of the opening of the World Cup in Rio de Janeiro, Christ the Redeemer will be lit up in the blue and white colors of the Argentine national team to show sportsmanship between the two nations, June 10, 2014.

Brazil World Cup Excitement Builds

Published June 11, 2014

Excitement is building in World Cup host country Brazil despite a transit strike in Sao Paulo, the site of the opening match, and social discontent in parts of the country.


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