• Former Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze smiles during an interview with Reuters in his residence in Tbilisi, Nov. 24, 2003.
  • Georgia's former President Eduard Shevardnadze casts his ballot during the presidential election at his residence in Tbilisi, Oct. 27, 2013.
  • U.S. President Bill Clinton meets with Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze in the Oval Office at the White House, Sept. 23, 1999.
  • Georgian leader Eduard Shevardnadze is sworn in as Georgian president in Tbilisi, Nov. 26, 1995.
  • Georgian leader Eduard Shevardnadze is seen in this television picture with cuts and bruises after escaping an apparent assassination attempt August 29, 1995.
  • Georgian Leader Eduard Shevardnadze and visiting Russian President Boris Yeltsin listen to Georgian Katolikos Patriarch Ilia ll in a Patriarch's church in Tbilisi, Feb. 03, 1994.
  • Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbechev and President Fidel Castro sign a friendship and cooperation treaty as Soviet Foreign Minister Edward Shevardnadze and Cuban Politburo member Juan Almeda shake hands, Havana, April 4, 1989.
  • U.S. Secretary of State James Baker and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze wave from a rubber raft after they went fishing in Snake River, Wyoming, Sept. 24, 1989.
  • A smiling President Ronald Reagan and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze walk from the Oval Office in the White House, Sept. 27, 1985.

Eduard Shevardnadze

Published July 07, 2014

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