Science & Technology

  • Frozen areas of the planet, like the Mendenhall Glacier in Alaska, are warming at twice the global average. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)
  • Black carbon or soot in the atmosphere accelerates ice melt on Columbia Glacier, Alaska, as documented by the Extreme Ice Survey time lapse cameras. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)
  • Aerial view of melt water on Greenland Ice Sheet, which has experienced significant loss in recent years, and is likely to contribute significantly to sea level rise. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)
  • On Greenland’s ice sheet, silt and soot blown from afar absorb solar heat and melt down into the ice. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)
  • Disko Bay, Greenland, where remains of the Ilulissat Glacier float toward the North Atlantic. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)
  • Icebergs, Ilulissat Isfjord, Greenland. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)
  • Aerial view of meltwater on the Greenland Ice Sheet. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)
  • Icebergs from Jökulsárlón, Iceland, break into small chucks like these so-called ice diamonds, which contribute, drop by drop, to the rise of global sea level. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)
  • Birthday Canyon, Greenland Ice Sheet, Greenland. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)
  • Greenland Ice Sheet melt water on the ice surface re-works windblown dust and soot into thick deposits. (James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey)

Global Warming on Thin Ice

Published November 15, 2013


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