Asia

    • A mourner pays tribute to the victims of the sunken ferry Sewol near condolence flowers at a temporary memorial at the auditorium of the Olympic Memorial Museum in Ansan, South Korea, April 24, 2014.
    • A man reads messages showing signs of hope for the safe return of passengers of the sunken ferry boat Sewol in Ansan, South Korea, April 24, 2014.
    • A Buddhist monk prays for passengers aboard the sunken ferry boat Sewol at a port in Jindo, South Korea, April 24, 2014.
    • A mourner weeps as she pays tribute to the victims of the sunken ferry Sewol, at a gymnasium in Ansan, South Korea, April 23, 2014.
    • A woman cries while praying during a candlelight vigil in Ansan, to commemorate the victims of capsized passenger ship Sewol and to wish for the safe return of missing passengers, April 23, 2014.
    • People pray during a candlelight vigil in Ansan, South Korea, April 23, 2014.
    • Family members of a missing passenger of capsized passenger ship Sewol wait for news at a gymnasium in the port city of Jindo, South Korea, April 23, 2014.
    • Searchers and divers look for people believed to have been trapped in the sunken ferry Sewol in the water off the southern coast near Jindo, South Korea, April 22, 2014.
    • The sun sets as searchers and divers look for bodies of passengers believed to have been trapped in the sunken ferry Sewol in the water off the southern coast near Jindo, South Korea, April 22, 2014.

    South Korea Mourns Ferry Victims

    Published April 24, 2014


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