Africa

  • Striking workers surround Liv Shange, a leader of South Africa's Workers and Socialist Party at a protest near Johannesburg. (Courtesy WASP)
  • The Workers and Socialist Party formed after the 2012 shooting of 34 striking miners at the so-called ‘Marikana Massacre’ at the Lonmin mine north of Johannesburg. (Courtesy WASP)
  • The political mission of WASP is human rights and a bigger slice of the economy for workers in South Africa. (Courtesy WASP)
  • One of WASP’s key demands is that the minimum wage in South Africa be raised to at least 12,500 rand. (Courtesy WASP)
  • The May 7 election is a test for fledgling WASP's organizers as they try to challenge the African National Congress for worker votes. (Courtesy WASP)
  • Shange supports another WASP leader addressing a protest near Johannesburg. (Courtesy WASP)
  • Supporters greeted Shange at the Johannesburg International Airport when the government finally re-admiitted the political activist following a holiday in Sweden last year. (Courtesy WASP)
  • "There’s a need for the working class, for workers, the unemployed, students ... to raise their own political voice," says Shange. (Courtesy WASP)

Workers and Socialists Campaign for Minimum Wage

Darren Taylor

Published February 19, 2014

The fourth in a series of five reports by Darren Taylor on fringe political parties gearing up for the May 7 South African elections.


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