Science & Technology

Artificial Insemination Used to Breed a Better Beei
|| 0:00:00
X
Rosanne Skirble
June 05, 2012 2:40 PM
Honeybees are in trouble. Each year since 2006, one-third of their hives have been wiped out by a mysterious disease called Colony Collapse Disorder. While experts are not sure, they say poor hive management, overworked bees, pesticides or parasitic mites could be to blame. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble met a beekeeper who is breeding a queen bee that can help her hive withstand the assault.

Artificial Insemination Used to Breed a Better Bee

Rosanne Skirble

Published June 05, 2012

Honeybees are in trouble. Each year since 2006, one-third of their hives have been wiped out by a mysterious disease called Colony Collapse Disorder. While experts are not sure, they say poor hive management, overworked bees, pesticides or parasitic mites could be to blame. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble met a beekeeper who is breeding a queen bee that can help her hive withstand the assault.


You May Like

At Khmer Rouge Court, Long-Awaited Verdict Approaches

First phase of trial, which is coming to an end, has focused on forced exodus of Phnom Penh in 1975 - and now many are hopeful justice will be served More

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities More

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

Downing of Malaysian airliner, allegations of cross-border shelling move information war in war-torn country to a new level More