Science & Technology

Human Rights Watch Campaigns Against 'Killer Robots'i
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November 23, 2012
Technology is moving fast when it comes to "autonomous systems", intelligent machines that perform tasks with little or no human guidance. In modern warfare, drones and other unmanned vehicles are playing an increasing role, with militaries embracing a technology that they say makes war safer and more effective. But human rights campaigners fear what might be to come -- fully autonomous weapons that could select and engage targets without human intervention -- and they want a new global treaty to stop that from happening. Selah Hennessy reports for VOA from London.

Human Rights Watch Campaigns Against 'Killer Robots'

Published November 23, 2012

Technology is moving fast when it comes to "autonomous systems", intelligent machines that perform tasks with little or no human guidance. In modern warfare, drones and other unmanned vehicles are playing an increasing role, with militaries embracing a technology that they say makes war safer and more effective. But human rights campaigners fear what might be to come -- fully autonomous weapons that could select and engage targets without human intervention -- and they want a new global treaty to stop that from happening. Selah Hennessy reports for VOA from London.


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