Asia

More Afghan Opium May Mean More Pakistani Addictsi
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Sharon Behn
November 28, 2012
In addition to economic challenges and insurgent violence, analysts say Pakistan is facing a growing drug problem that is likely to worsen after international troops leave neighboring Afghanistan, the world's leading opium producer. The opium and derivatives come to Pakistan from neighboring Afghanistan. Sharon Behn reports on the impact that narcotics, which are easily available, are having on Pakistani society.

More Afghan Opium May Mean More Pakistani Addicts

Sharon Behn

Published November 28, 2012

In addition to economic challenges and insurgent violence, analysts say Pakistan is facing a growing drug problem that is likely to worsen after international troops leave neighboring Afghanistan, the world's leading opium producer. The opium and derivatives come to Pakistan from neighboring Afghanistan. Sharon Behn reports on the impact that narcotics, which are easily available, are having on Pakistani society.


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