Health

Lack of US Support for Mental Health Care Criticizedi
X
January 09, 2013 12:46 AM
Most people with mental illness do not commit violent crimes. But acts of mass violence by apparently deranged young men have focused public attention in the United States on how hard it can be to identify and diagnose people with serious mental illnesses, and to get them effective treatment before they do harm to themselves or others. Carol Pearson spoke with a mental health expert and with a family that has sought psychiatric help, about some of the challenges people face in securing good mental health services in the United States.

Lack of US Support for Mental Health Care Criticized

Published January 08, 2013

Most people with mental illness do not commit violent crimes. But acts of mass violence by apparently deranged young men have focused public attention in the United States on how hard it can be to identify and diagnose people with serious mental illnesses, and to get them effective treatment before they do harm to themselves or others. Carol Pearson spoke with a mental health expert and with a family that has sought psychiatric help, about some of the challenges people face in securing good mental health services in the United States.


You May Like

Australia-Cambodia Resettlement Agreement Raises Concerns

Agreement calls for Cambodia to accept refugees in return for $35 million in aid and reflects Australia’s harder line approach towards asylum seekers and refugees More

India Looks to Become Arms Supplier Instead of Buyer

US hopes India can become alternative to China for countries looking to buy weapons, but experts question growth potential of Indian arms industry More

Earth Day Concert, Rally Draws Thousands in Washington

President Obama also took up the issue Saturday in his weekly address, saying there 'no greater threat to our planet than climate change' More