Health

US Plays Unique Role in Fighting World's Deadliest Diseasesi
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April 10, 2013 1:55 PM
Over the past two decades, the U.S. government, American businesses and private individuals have joined in unprecedented collaborations to study the world's most dangerous diseases -- and to help more people around the world receive medical care for HIV-AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other maladies. These efforts have had a huge positive impact. HIV is now survivable, the number of AIDS orphans has declined dramatically, and in some countries, entire medical-care systems have been transformed. VOA's Carol Pearson looks at the unique role the US has played, and continues to play, in advancing global health.

US Plays Unique Role in Fighting World's Deadliest Diseases

Published April 10, 2013

Over the past two decades, the U.S. government, American businesses and private individuals have joined in unprecedented collaborations to study the world's most dangerous diseases -- and to help more people around the world receive medical care for HIV-AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other maladies. These efforts have had a huge positive impact. HIV is now survivable, the number of AIDS orphans has declined dramatically, and in some countries, entire medical-care systems have been transformed. VOA's Carol Pearson looks at the unique role the US has played, and continues to play, in advancing global health.


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