USA

Washington Newseum Honors 82 Journalists Killed in 2012i
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May 14, 2013 12:57 AM
The First Amendment to the US Constitution guarantees freedom of speech and also protects freedom of the press. But in many countries, journalists are not allowed to report the news or criticize their governments, and are punished or even killed for doing so. And in war zones, journalists are frequently exposed to crossfire. The dangers to journalists are evident in the number of those killed in the line of duty. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti takes us to the Newseum in Washington, to show us the most dangerous country for journalists in 2012.

Washington Newseum Honors 82 Journalists Killed in 2012

Published May 13, 2013

The First Amendment to the US Constitution guarantees freedom of speech and also protects freedom of the press. But in many countries, journalists are not allowed to report the news or criticize their governments, and are punished or even killed for doing so. And in war zones, journalists are frequently exposed to crossfire. The dangers to journalists are evident in the number of those killed in the line of duty. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti takes us to the Newseum in Washington, to show us the most dangerous country for journalists in 2012.


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