USA

    US Agriculture Industry Opposes Changes to Food Aid Programi
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    June 18, 2013 6:59 PM
    The Food for Peace program costs about $1.5 billion annually and provides U.S.-grown food to countries in need. But President Barack Obama’s proposed 2014 budget includes changes to the 59-year-old program -- replacing some commodity shipments with direct cash purchases in foreign countries. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports -- while some aid agencies welcome the proposed changes, farmers and millers in the midwestern United States say the changes will hurt their business and cost U.S. jobs.

    US Agriculture Industry Opposes Changes to Food Aid Program

    Published June 18, 2013

    The Food for Peace program costs about $1.5 billion annually and provides U.S.-grown food to countries in need. But President Barack Obama’s proposed 2014 budget includes changes to the 59-year-old program -- replacing some commodity shipments with direct cash purchases in foreign countries. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports -- while some aid agencies welcome the proposed changes, farmers and millers in the midwestern United States say the changes will hurt their business and cost U.S. jobs.


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