Africa

Journalism Brings Hope for Young Somalians Despite Dangeri
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August 15, 2013 1:38 PM
They are 17, 18, 20 years old. They are journalists in Mogadishu, one of the most dangerous places in the world for reporters. At Radio Shabelle, the biggest station in Somalia, most of the journalists are young and don't have much experience, but they are devoted and passionate, despite being targets of the terrorist group al-Shabab. Emilie Iob and Patricia Huon interviewed some of these journalists for VOA on a trip to Mogadishu.

Journalism Brings Hope for Young Somalians Despite Danger

Published August 15, 2013

They are 17, 18, 20 years old. They are journalists in Mogadishu, one of the most dangerous places in the world for reporters. At Radio Shabelle, the biggest station in Somalia, most of the journalists are young and don't have much experience, but they are devoted and passionate, despite being targets of the terrorist group al-Shabab. Emilie Iob and Patricia Huon interviewed some of these journalists for VOA on a trip to Mogadishu.


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