Middle East

    Syrian, American Doctors Skype in Chemical Weapons 'Situation Room'i
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    September 17, 2013 2:45 PM
    A field hospital near Aleppo was destroyed Wednesday by shelling, killing the six medical personnel inside, and patients. The Syrian American Medical Society says that hospital was the third that has been destroyed in the town in two years - in a war that has killed more than 100,000 people. A group of surgeons in the United States - through the Union of Syrian Medical Relief Organizations and the Syrian American Medical Society - is assisting with the increasing medical needs - without ever entering a Syrian operating room. VOA's Carolyn Presutti takes us into a secret Skype surgery session for this exclusive report.

    Syrian, American Doctors Skype in Chemical Weapons 'Situation Room'

    Published September 17, 2013

    A field hospital near Aleppo was destroyed Wednesday by shelling, killing the six medical personnel inside, and patients. The Syrian American Medical Society says that hospital was the third that has been destroyed in the town in two years - in a war that has killed more than 100,000 people. A group of surgeons in the United States - through the Union of Syrian Medical Relief Organizations and the Syrian American Medical Society - is assisting with the increasing medical needs - without ever entering a Syrian operating room. VOA's Carolyn Presutti takes us into a secret Skype surgery session for this exclusive report.


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