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    US Veterans Urge Lawmakers to Resolve Differences, End Shutdowni
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    October 16, 2013 12:40 AM
    The U.S. government remains shut down in a partial closure that has put hundreds of thousands of Americans out of work, at least temporarily. Lawmakers have yet to reach common ground, and that means many federal workers stay home and national parks, monuments and museums stay closed. Some vocal veterans’ groups visited Washington over the weekend to protest the closures. But they were not the only ones there. Seeking their place in the spotlight were lawmakers aligned with the “Tea Party,” a group of lawmakers within the Republican Party vehemently opposed to compromising with Democrats on matters of budget. Arash Arabasadi has this story.

    US Veterans Urge Lawmakers to Resolve Differences, End Shutdown

    Published October 15, 2013

    The U.S. government remains shut down in a partial closure that has put hundreds of thousands of Americans out of work, at least temporarily. Lawmakers have yet to reach common ground, and that means many federal workers stay home and national parks, monuments and museums stay closed. Some vocal veterans’ groups visited Washington over the weekend to protest the closures. But they were not the only ones there. Seeking their place in the spotlight were lawmakers aligned with the “Tea Party,” a group of lawmakers within the Republican Party vehemently opposed to compromising with Democrats on matters of budget. Arash Arabasadi has this story.


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