Middle East

The Lonely Path of an Egyptian Liberali
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November 11, 2013 12:24 PM
The unity that marked Egypt's 2011 uprising against Hosni Mubarak has fractured, leaving the country polarized, mostly between Islamists aligned with the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of the military-backed government. Caught in the middle is a small and increasingly isolated group whose main interest is democracy. A leading voice in this liberal and largely secular movement is Alaa al-Aswany, one of the region's best-known writers. From Cairo, the author talks to VOA’s Elizabeth Arrott about his growing frustration.

The Lonely Path of an Egyptian Liberal

Published November 11, 2013

The unity that marked Egypt's 2011 uprising against Hosni Mubarak has fractured, leaving the country polarized, mostly between Islamists aligned with the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of the military-backed government. Caught in the middle is a small and increasingly isolated group whose main interest is democracy. A leading voice in this liberal and largely secular movement is Alaa al-Aswany, one of the region's best-known writers. From Cairo, the author talks to VOA’s Elizabeth Arrott about his growing frustration.


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