Economy

    US Central Bank Reduces Monthly Bond Purchases to $65 Billioni
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    January 30, 2014 1:59 AM
    The U.S. central bank says it will trim another $10 billion from its bond buying program, saying that despite weaker than expected job growth, the world’s largest economy is gaining strength. The announcement Wednesday means the Federal Reserve will buy $65 billion in securities next month, instead of the $75 billion it purchased in January. The program, called quantitative easing, is credited with stimulating the U.S. economy by making more money available to investors and keeping interest rates low. But as Mil Arcega reports, investors who have grown accustomed to the monetary stimulus are having a hard time letting go.

    US Central Bank Reduces Monthly Bond Purchases to $65 Billion

    Published January 29, 2014

    The U.S. central bank says it will trim another $10 billion from its bond buying program, saying that despite weaker than expected job growth, the world’s largest economy is gaining strength. The announcement Wednesday means the Federal Reserve will buy $65 billion in securities next month, instead of the $75 billion it purchased in January. The program, called quantitative easing, is credited with stimulating the U.S. economy by making more money available to investors and keeping interest rates low. But as Mil Arcega reports, investors who have grown accustomed to the monetary stimulus are having a hard time letting go.


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