Economy

World Cup Cities Say Climate Change Is Big Part of Planningi
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February 08, 2014 1:33 AM
The World Cup soccer tournament is getting more and more carbon-heavy, with FIFA estimating that the 2014 event in Brazil will dump 2.72 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere -- one million more tons than South Africa’s 2010 World Cup. Reporting in Johannesburg for VOA, Anita Powell asks officials from both sides of the globe how they incorporated climate change concerns into the World Cup.

World Cup Cities Say Climate Change Is Big Part of Planning

Published February 07, 2014

The World Cup soccer tournament is getting more and more carbon-heavy, with FIFA estimating that the 2014 event in Brazil will dump 2.72 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere -- one million more tons than South Africa’s 2010 World Cup. Reporting in Johannesburg for VOA, Anita Powell asks officials from both sides of the globe how they incorporated climate change concerns into the World Cup.


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