Europe

Survivors Commemorate 70th Anniversary of Nazi Liquidation of Jewish Ghettoi
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Kane Farabaugh
August 30, 2014 1:20 AM
When the German Nazi army occupied the Polish city of Lodz in 1939, it marked the beginning of a long nightmare for the Jewish community that once made up one third of the population. Roughly 200,000 people were forced into the Lodz Ghetto. Less than 7,000 survived. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, some survivors gathered at the Union League Club in Chicago on the 70th anniversary of the liquidation of the Lodz Ghetto to remember those who suffered at the hands of the Nazi regime.

Survivors Commemorate 70th Anniversary of Nazi Liquidation of Jewish Ghetto

Kane Farabaugh

Published August 29, 2014

When the German Nazi army occupied the Polish city of Lodz in 1939, it marked the beginning of a long nightmare for the Jewish community that once made up one third of the population. Roughly 200,000 people were forced into the Lodz Ghetto. Less than 7,000 survived. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, some survivors gathered at the Union League Club in Chicago on the 70th anniversary of the liquidation of the Lodz Ghetto to remember those who suffered at the hands of the Nazi regime.


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by: Yvonne Kowalczewski from: Boston, MA
September 04, 2014 6:09 PM
There is no mention in this piece about the identity of the perpetrators -- Germany! "Nazi" is neither a country nor a nationality. There was no such place as "Nazistan." Why is the writer reticent about naming the criminals?


by: bonabiel from: egypt
September 02, 2014 8:10 AM
and Israel kill kids and elder citizen in #gazza


by: Michael H Traison from: Chicago
August 31, 2014 7:07 PM
We cannot praise the Union league club enough. The club made this event possible. They have a mandate to serve the community and they go well beyond the call of duty. Many of us are determined to join this club after witnessing how they devoted themselves to this project.


by: Michael H Traison from: Chicago
August 31, 2014 7:05 PM
I was there and the Union league club was magnificent. I know that the Union league club made this event possible and devoted hundreds of man-hours.


by: Zamoyski from: Bakewell, England
August 31, 2014 12:07 PM
Urgent Correction Requested

For Attention of Kane Farabaugh:

In the following article published on 29 August 2014

http://www.voanews.com/media/video/2433016.html

the written content shows a clear difference between the headline and the body of content. I am objecting specifically to the description of the ghetto in Lodz as "Polish" in the headline, but as "Jewish" in the main body of content, as seen below, with suggested correction shown in parentheses:

"Survivors Commemorate 70th Anniversary of Nazi German Liquidation of Polish (should be Lodz) Ghetto

Kane Farabaugh

Published August 29, 2014

When the Nazi German army moved into (NOTE: please change "moved into" to "occupied", as it was definitely a forced, military occupation, not with any sort of acquiescence by the Polish government operating in exile at that time) the Polish city of Lodz in 1939, it marked the beginning of a long nightmare for the Jewish community that once made up one third of the population. Roughly 200,000 people were forced into the Lodz Ghetto. Less than 7,000 survived. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, some survivors gathered in Chicago on the 70th anniversary of the liquidation of the Lodz Ghetto to remember those who suffered at the hands of the Nazi (German) regime. "


There are 3 points to comment upon here, of which I would have hoped Mr Farabough would have been aware, so this "education" and Correction Request is supplied for his benefit, while asking him to hereby amend his article forthwith.

1. There were no "Polish" ghettos during WWII; there were only Nazi German created ghettos intended for Jews in occupied Poland. That does take more words, but in my view they are all essential words required to report accurately on highly sensitive historical issues. Auschwitz was originally created in early 1940 by the Nazi Germans to contain and control non-Jewish Polish political prisoners and resistance fighters; it did not become a mass extermination camp for Jews until 1942.

2. The words "German" and "Germany" do not appear even once in the printed article. There is no mention of the word "occupied" either, but "Polish" and "Nazi" appear more than once. In order to minimise any totally incorrect word-association between Polish and Nazi (which would certainly be the case in Neuro Linguistic Programing terms - NLP), "Nazi" should always be shown with "German" or "Germany" at the start of an article, with "Nazi" only appearing on its own later on. You will have seen the suggested amendments above. Poland should always be referred to as occupied during WWII.

3. As to the video-with-voice report, I would not expect that Mr Farabough will want to re-record that, and insert "German" and "Germany" with the use of "Nazi". But I would urge anyone who reads this to please do not be seen to be in any sense "colluding" after-the-fact with the post-WWII Naxi Germans who sought to distance themselves from the atrocities that they committed against Jews, Poles and against Polish culture. The Nazi Germans referred to both Jews and Poles as "untermensch".

In summary, would Mr Farabough please amend his article as soon as possible. I am aware that 1 September is Labor Day in the USA this year, so there may be a slight delay in this message being forwarded to Mr Farabough. However, 1 September is also the 65th Anniversary of the 1939 Nazi German invasion of Poland, which was followed by the Soviet Russian invasion of Poland on 17 September. So, for the sake of the 3 million non-Jewish Poles who perished in the "forgotten" Polish holocaust during WWII, please make these amendments as soon as possible. And also, perhaps, in memory of the fact that more Poles are recognised at Yad Vashem as Righteous Gentiles than from any other nation, by a large magnitude.

Regards,

Dan Zamoyski