Africa

    20 Years After Genocide, Rwanda Prospers But Political Freedom Remains Elusivei
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    April 09, 2014 7:29 PM
    Rwanda is a country on the move, having rebuilt from the 1994 genocide that divided the nation and left an estimated 800,000 people dead. But as VOA's Gabe Joselow reports, some say the country's recovery has come at the cost of political freedom.

    20 Years After Genocide, Rwanda Prospers But Political Freedom Remains Elusive

    Published April 09, 2014

    Rwanda is a country on the move, having rebuilt from the 1994 genocide that divided the nation and left an estimated 800,000 people dead. But as VOA's Gabe Joselow reports, some say the country's recovery has come at the cost of political freedom.


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    by: Anonymous
    April 09, 2014 9:58 PM
    The reporter is not serious at all: apart from the ruling party RPF, there are 10 registered opposition political parties: where did you get only one opposition political party.