Science & Technology

    A greater greater honeyguide bird perches on the hand of a Yao honey gatherer.

    Avian Honeyguides Lead Human Hunters to Honey

    Evolution in action: birds that feed on beeswax and humans who gather honey work together in Mozambique

    FILE - This handout photo released by Solar Impulse 2 shows the solar-powered plane, piloted by André Borschberg, during the flyover of the pyramids of Giza prior to landing in Cairo, July 13, 2016.

    Solar Plane Leaves Cairo on Last Leg of Flight Around World

    If all goes well, pilot Bertrand Piccard will steer plane across Arabian Peninsula, land in Abu Dhabi early Tuesday

    FILE - man is silhouetted against a video screen with an Facebook logo as he poses with an Samsung S4 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, August 14, 2013.

    US Joins Case over Facebook Data Transfers from EU

    The case, which aims to determine whether personal privacy is properly protected from U.S. government surveillance, is expected to be referred to the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) following a request by Irish data protection authorities in May


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    Special Glasses Help Autistic Children Read Emotions of Othersi
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    July 20, 2016 6:12 PM

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    Scientists in Poland Race to Save Honeybeesi
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    George Putic
    July 22, 2016 10:01 PM
    Honeybees are in danger worldwide. Causes of what's known as colony collapse disorder range from pesticides and loss of habitat to infections. But scientists in Poland say they are on track to finding a cure for one of the diseases. VOA’s George Putic reports.
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    Video Scientists in Poland Race to Save Honeybees

    Honeybees are in danger worldwide. Causes of what's known as colony collapse disorder range from pesticides and loss of habitat to infections. But scientists in Poland say they are on track to finding a cure for one of the diseases. VOA’s George Putic reports.
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    Video UN: Global Warming Happening Faster Than Predicted

    The World Meteorological Organization says the first half of this year has been the hottest in history - a sign that global warming is happening faster than expected. The U.N. organization based in Geneva warned Thursday that 2016 is on track to be the world’s hottest year on record. Zlatica Hoke reports the WMO called on signatories to start implementing the climate agreement reached last year in Paris as soon as possible.
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    Video World Sees Hope in Ending Mother-to-child HIV Transmissions

    AIDS looks vastly different today than it did the last time the International AIDS Conference was held in South Africa 16 years ago. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on one major success in containing the virus.
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    Video New HIV Tests Emphasize Rapid Results

    As the global fight against AIDS intensifies, activists have placed increasing importance on getting people to know their HIV status. Some companies are developing new HIV testing methods designed to be quick, easy and accurate. Thuso Khumalo looks at the latest methods, presented at the International AIDS conference in Durban, South Africa.
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    Video F-35 Steals the Show at Farnborough

    At this year's international airshow in Farnborough, England, one of the stars proved to be the U.S. Johnny-come-lately fighter plane with its advanced engine, touted as the most powerful in the world. In spite of the steep price of over $100 million, Lockheed Martin's F-35 fighter jet is sought by many militaries around the world. VOA's George Putic reports.
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    Video Want a Successful Startup? Adopt the Silicon Valley Culture

    California's Silicon Valley is known for innovation and the countless number of technology startups in the area. While many of these companies are working on very different products, entrepreneurs tend to share a culture of openness and a free exchange of ideas. VOA's Elizabeth Lee spoke to a Silicon Valley entrepreneur from Latin America who believes the region would benefit from the kind of mentality that exists in Silicon Valley.
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    Video Cities Provide Pollination Haven for Honeybees

    The Western Honey Bee was brought to the United States a long time ago because — true to its name — it makes a lot of honey. But it is also a great pollinator. Like cattle, they are bred by the millions and shipped around the country to pollinate everything from almonds to broccoli. But all that hard work and stress is literally killing the bees. To help fight the problem, concerned citizens are raising honeybees everywhere they can, including inside city limits. Treva Thrush reports.
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    Video Large Windows May Collect Solar Energy

    Along with other modern technologies, photovoltaics are seeing increased use. A big race is on for a transparent type of these solar cells that may one day cover windows of large buildings, substantially lowering energy bills. Experts, however, say there are still some major obstacles. VOA's George Putic reports.
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    Video Immigrants Drawn to Silicon Valley Culture

    California's Silicon Valley, known for its high-tech startups, can be described as a melting-pot of different cultures and languages, all concentrated in the region's technology companies. While trying to start a company as an immigrant can be difficult in some places, that is not necessarily the case in Silicon Valley, says the co-founder of a start-up called Osmo. Just like his product which is designed for children, Silicon Valley is breaking down cultural barriers.
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    Video Self-Driving Cars Still Need Human Drivers

    After the recent fatal crash of a Tesla electric car while driving in autopilot mode, questions were raised about whether self-driving cars are ready for everyday traffic. Experts say the tragedy will not slow the race toward autonomous cars, but that the public should better understand the current limits of the new technology. VOA's George Putic reports.