Science & Technology

FILE - A warbler is seen sitting on a branch during a bird count on the Gulf Coast in Grand Isle, Louisiana.

Tennessee Songbirds Fly Coop Long Before Tornadoes Arrive

Researchers say birds apparently alerted to danger by sounds at frequencies below range of human hearing More

A banner for Sony Pictures' "The Interview," a film whose release was recently canceled, is posted high outside Arclight Cinemas in Hollywood, California, Dec. 17, 2014.

Cyberattacks Are Here to Stay, Experts Say

Global businesses' networks are now so complex that they've become increasingly difficult to protect More

Refined by natural selection, spider webs and leaves serve as models for new and highly effective optoelectronic networks and displays, a team of researchers reported recently in Nature Communications.

Spiders, Leaves Guide Network Designers

Boston College physicist says idea starts with premise that natural forms offer efficient solutions More

The United States is often described as a nation of immigrants, but the major ethnic groups do not have the clear-cut ancestry their names imply.

Study Paints Complex Picture of Americans’ Ethnicity

Genetics firm finds, for instance, that African-Americans, European-Americans, Latinos can have ancestry from any or all of those continental regions More

FILE - Ibuprofen pills.

Study: Ibuprofen Extends Life in Simple Species

Researchers find tantalizing hint to longer life in one of world’s most commonly used medicines More


More Science & Technology News

Sydney Hostage-taker Failed to Manipulate Social Media

Gunman forced captives to use personal Facebook, YouTube accounts to issue his demands; online community helped flag messages, urged others not to share them
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Survey: No Consensus How to Curb Eroding Online Privacy

Will digital privacy even exist in the next 10 years?
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Google Looks to Head off US Antitrust Lawsuit over Android

Google argued the proposed class action should be dismissed; plaintiffs countered that default settings are set to them and most consumers do not know how to switch
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Past Cyber Crimes Link N. Korea to Sony Attack

Experts say Malware found is same as that was used in the past against South Korean targets and comes from a North Korean IP address
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Ghana Prepares for Nuclear Energy Program

Ghana eventually hopes to become a power exporter to its West African neighbors
More

India Launches its Largest Rocket into Space

The rocket carried an unmanned capsule which could send astronauts into space
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Report on Risks Leads New York State to Ban 'Fracking'

Reports of polluted water, leaking fumes near wells have fueled vigorous opposition to controversial oil and gas drilling technique
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Ebola Threatens Millions With Food Insecurity

FAO, WFP warn drastic action needed
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Scientists Close In on Sustainable Nuclear Fusioni
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George Putic
December 12, 2014 6:21 PM
Scientists in the United States, Europe and elsewhere are experimenting with two types of fusion nuclear reactors that could someday provide cheap and abundant energy and finally wean the world from fossil-based fuels. The U.S. technological giant Lockheed Martin has claimed it will have a working fusion reactor within five years. Now, scientists from the University of Washington say they are also on the path to creating sustainable fusion. VOA’s George Putic reports.
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Video Scientists Close In on Sustainable Nuclear Fusion

Scientists in the United States, Europe and elsewhere are experimenting with two types of fusion nuclear reactors that could someday provide cheap and abundant energy and finally wean the world from fossil-based fuels. The U.S. technological giant Lockheed Martin has claimed it will have a working fusion reactor within five years. Now, scientists from the University of Washington say they are also on the path to creating sustainable fusion. VOA’s George Putic reports.
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Video US Scientists Get Closer Look at Egyptian Mummy

Egyptologists at Chicago's Field Museum have opened the coffin of a 2,500-year-old Egyptian mummy to repair damage. The necessity of performing conservation work gives scholars a rare opportunity to see a mummy from the inside and to learn more about ancient Egyptian burial practices. Zlatica Hoke has the story.
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Video Bird Genomes Sequenced for Avian Tree of Life

Sixty-five million years ago, an asteroid hit Earth, killing the dinosaurs and many other life forms. Birds were among the survivors, and, after that mass extinction, as life began to flower again, a burst of evolution gave rise to the more than 10,000 bird species we know today. As VOA’s Rosanne Skirble reports, researchers worldwide have joined to create the most reliable avian tree of life to date.
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Video Technology Reduces Time in Dentist’s Chair

Medical robots help surgeons perform delicate operations more safely and with greater dexterity than with instruments manipulated by hand. These sophisticated tools also help doctors work more quickly. One such machine reduces the time it takes to manufacture dental crowns to just a couple of hours. VOA’s George Putic has more.
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Video More US Cities Grapple with Plastic Bag Laws

As Americans begin the holiday shopping season, debate over disposable plastic bag consumption continues. VOA's Deborah Block has more.