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VOA Connect Episode 169, Everyday People


VOA – CONNECT
EPISODE #169
AIR DATE 04 09 2021
TRANSCRIPT

OPEN ((VO/NAT))
((Banner))
Team Spirit
((SOT))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
((NATS))
Come on, come on.
I'm fortunate to be able to coach really good athletes. I think
that when you're successful, that it is a combination of, you
know, you being able to get the best out of your athletes, but
you have to have good athletes to work with.
((Animation Transition))
((Banner))
Thinking of Others
((SOT))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
Hey guys. It’s Zoe and I’m the CEO of the Zoe Project.
I started my project with making cards for anyone in nursing
homes, nurses, doctors or anyone in jail, anyone who feels
forgotten.
((Animation Transition))
((Banner))
Live and Learn
((SOT))
((Helen D’Ann Dorris, Librarian))
The lady that he was going on a date with, I babysat her son
so they could go on a date. That's how I met my husband.
((Open Animation))


BLOCK A

((PKG)) FEMALE VARSITY BOYS BASKETBALL COACH
((TRT: 9:06))
((Topic Banner: Playing True))
((Reporter/Camera: Arturo Martínez))
((Map: Fallon, Nevada))
((Main character: 1 male))
((Sub characters: 4 males; 1 female))
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Come on. G up. Come on, Sam.
Good, good.
Nice, nice. Stay with it.
Push, push, push, push, push, push.
Don’t get screened, Matt. Don’t get screened.
Board, board, board, board.
Got it, baby.
Keith, nice shot.
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
My name is Chelle Dalager and I coach the boys varsity
basketball team at Churchill County High School. In the
state of Nevada, I'm the first female coach to coach a boys
varsity program.
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Back cut, back cut.
Next pass.
Look, look.
Back cut him. Back cut him.
Nice. There you go. Good rig, Keith. Nice pass.
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
There is really more to basketball than just the game of
basketball. It really is about life lessons. Your life is full of
wins and losses, you know. You feel like you've done
something great, and sure enough somebody will knock you
down or you feel like you're maybe not so great, and then
something picks you up. It teaches kids discipline, teaches
them about work ethic and it teaches about being able to rely
upon somebody and about a commitment to a family.
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Here we go. Rotate.
First off, you're not always going to reach your goal,
right? You're not always going to make it. That's just part of
life and part of basketball. What you should never do is stop
or quit playing hard or stop trying to at least get the highest
number you can get. We made lots of good progress when
we were early, right? So then, you all went home and had
turkey legs. And then, I don't know what happened,
right? Like our minds aren't focused on basketball
anymore. And really this is where we should be the most
focused we can be. Understand? So, talk to your pals and
get them out. Okay? Questions? Collin? Guys? All
right. Let's go. Let's go. Let's go.
((NATS))
((Keith Smith, Boys Varsity Basketball Player, Churchill
County High School))
I love it. It's probably like my favorite basketball coach. I've
played for a couple of different coaches and she's just
different. She pushes us, the intensity, demands a lot out of
us.
((Toby Anderson, Boys Varsity Basketball Player,
Churchill County High School))
She really pushes us to our limits and I think that's why we
have done well the past few years. We've been just pushing
hard in practice and getting what we need done.
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Wave on me. Wave on three. One, two, three.
((NATS: Team))
Wave.
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
We've just completed and we've won two state
championships back to back. One in 2019 and one in 2020.
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
This is the state championship team that won for the first
time in 47 years, and it's pretty exciting. The last time they
won a state championship was in 1971, and that was the
year I was born.
You can see my two boys together. Number 11, that was
Avery when he was a sophomore, and just behind him with a
big curly head, that was Hayden when he was a senior.
This is our basketball trophy case. Here's our first one and
the other one is in my office because I'm not ready to give it
up yet. So, this is 2020 and this is 2019. And so, I play
those. If I'm in a bad mood, I go back and I watch both of
them.
((NATS: TV show))
State Championship, Churchill County High School taking on
Elko High School. Game time. Less than 10 seconds left in
OT [overtime]. And that’s Elijah Jackson. However, not the
first time it’s happened.
What? Flashback in 2019, Nevada 3A Basketball State
Championship. Elijah Jackson hit the three against the
same team. Boom. Ridiculous. No way..…to win the state
championship. No way.
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Second time. Second shot.
((NATS/MUSIC))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
I'm fortunate to be able to coach really good athletes. I think
that when you're successful, that it is a combination of, you
know, you being able to get the best out of your athletes, but
you have to have good athletes to work with.
It's not about gender for me. It's really about just coaching
and trusting your players and, you know, making them
believe in themselves.
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach)) add chyron
I really did not expect to get the job. I wasn't really even
going to apply for it because I didn't think that I would get it
because you don't ever see, you know, women getting those
types of positions. And so, you've hired a female
coach. Yes, she's coach, but now we have two state
championships to go with that. And I think that just helps
people, maybe, recognize, I hope that a lot of female
coaches get hired to coach male programs because I don't
think it's a gender issue, right? It's you just don't see it very
often. Although, you see men coach and women's team. It's
just never been done, I guess. And that's what makes it
pretty special. It makes it unique.
((NATS/MUSIC))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Also, a really cool thing for me is that my two sons were on
the team and we got to share a state championship
together. That's a big memory for me.
So, that was them playing youth basketball for me. The left
one is when they were a little bit younger. The right one is
when they were a little bit older. You can tell that they're
getting a little bit taller than me. When they were growing
up, we played a lot of different games outside at
home. When they started beating me, I started using my
Achilles as a crutch.
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
When basketball season happens, that's all that we're
doing. I'm at school at 7:00 in the morning and I don't really
get home until 8:30 at night.
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
James or Lacey is here.
Are you sure?
How was your day?
((Avery Stresdin, High School Student, Michelle’s Son))
Good.
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Good?
Where are you going?
((Avery Stresdin, High School Student, Michelle’s Son))
Nowhere.
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Nowhere. You are just hanging out?
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Oh, this looks so good.
My partner at home is very supportive. Our boys are her
biological sons and, you know, she's been really supportive
about, you know, having me coach them and she's a huge
part of our team as well. She travels and goes to all the
games and takes our scorebook.
((Photo Courtesy: Thomas Ranson / Lahontan Valley
News))
((Tricia Strasdin, Michelle’s Partner))
We love basketball.
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Yeah.
((Tricia Strasdin, Michelle’s Partner))
We got lucky. If you get the opportunity to embrace anything
that is going to bring your family together,
((Photo Courtesy: Thomas Ranson / Lahontan Valley
News))
((Tricia Strasdin, Michelle’s Partner))
and you get to travel together, and you get to experience
success together, and you get to fail together, and you get to
kind of pick yourselves up and try again together, and you
get to have some early mornings and some late nights and
some long weekends together, I'm not sure that it matters if
it's basketball or what it is.
((Photo Courtesy: Thomas Ranson / Lahontan Valley
News))
((Tricia Strasdin, Michelle’s Partner))
I think it helped us in lots of different ways.
((Hayden Stresdin, Former High School Student,
Michelle’s Son))
I'll never forget it. I was glad to have my mom as a coach
and my brother on the team for my year, and then for him to
win a back-to-back is even cooler.
((Avery Stresdin, High School Student, Michelle’s Son))
Yeah, I don't have so many words for it, if I’m being honest.
((NATS/MUSIC))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
For me, it's the best memories I will have with basketball will
be with my family and, you know, what we brought to Fallon,
and we've been able to travel to all those tournaments
together, and then I coach them, and then we get back in the
car and we talk about the games and…..
((NATS))
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
Start close, they say.
Oh, one for one.
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
I was a terrible shooter in high school. And then, when I
went to community college, it got a little bit better because I
was a little bit older.
I'm thankful for Fallon. They've supported me in coaching
100 percent. I just have, we haven't run into issues like
that. My 2019 team, some kids on other teams were, you
know, giving them a hard time about me, you know, being
gay and about them playing for a woman.
((Michelle Dalager, High School Athletic Training
Teacher, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach))
And, you know, I just told my players, I said, “That doesn't
hurt my feelings.” And he was like, “Well, what do you
mean, coach? It doesn't?” I said, “No, because it's
true. Yes, I'm in a relationship with a woman. That makes
me gay.” And I said, “I'm sorry you have to feel like you
have to defend me. You don't.” I said, “It does not hurt my
feelings at all. Now, if they call me fat, then you can get after
them, right? But other than that, just let them say whatever
they want to say, and you prove your point by just playing
the best basketball you can play and beating the people that
are saying those mean things.” And that’s a life lesson,
right?
((Video courtesy: Thomas Ranson / Lahontan Valley
News))
((NATS/MUSIC))


TEASE ((VO/NAT))
Coming up…..
((Banner))
Online Learning
((SOT))
((Arti Jain-Kumar, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love and Light 4 Kidz))
I know in my own house we have had an exorbitant amount
of screen time, and it can be difficult even after the school
day is done, to find the balance of turning it off.

BREAK ONE
BUMP IN ((ANIM))


BLOCK B


((PKG)) ZOE’S CARDS
((TRT: 04:00))
((Topic Banner: Zoe’s Cards))
((Reporter:??Faiza Elmasry))?
((Camera/Editor:??Adam Greenbaum))
((Map:??Gainesville, Virginia))??
((Main characters:?? 2 female))
((NATS))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
You can keep a card forever. It won't go anywhere. You
can send them to anyone you want and you can just write a
little note inside which means a lot.
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
I started creating cards when I was probably like a little baby
((Photo Courtesy: Zoe’s Project))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
and we always created the cards in school for Valentine's
Day, Mother's Day, Father's Day, Christmas. I started
making cards then, and then it just kept getting bigger and
bigger and bigger and bigger.
((NATS))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
I have started my cards during this pandemic. I use all
different kinds of colored paper. I use markers and I use
stickers to make it have a little spice in there, to make it look
cute. I write scriptures on the front of the cards and on the
inside of the cards, there is just a happy note.
((NATS))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
I deliver my cards anywhere near us. So, my mom would
drive to the nursing home and we would have to call the
nursing home because we can't come inside. You pass the
cards to a nurse that comes to the door. And they would
deliver it to anyone in the nursing home.
((NATS: Zoe Moser and Nurse))
Oh, my God! I have to hug you. I know I’m not supposed to.
I miss you so much. Look at you, you’re growing up. You’re
so beautiful.
Thank you.
You’re so talented.
Thank you.
Thank you, baby doll.
You’re welcome. Thank you.
Thank you. We love you, okay!
Thank you. See you. Bye.
Bye.
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
Lonely people need a cheering card so they can feel loved.
((NATS: Zoe Moser and Olivia on the phone))
Hey, Olivia.
Hey, Zoe.
What you’re doing?
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
I do keep in touch with my friends. We also have little
events sometimes where we get together on Zoom. We
have movie nights. We talk. We eat our snacks on Zoom or
we'll just call on a daily basis to check up on each other.
((NATS: Zoe Moser and Sharmaine Moser))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
Well, this is all of our family right here. While my family is in
North Carolina, we keep in touch with them on social media.
When we moved to Virginia, it was a big impact on my life
because we had no family here. So, it was just me and my
mom.
((NATS: Zoe Moser and Sharmaine Moser))
Oh, I like it. What other colors do you have? You’ve got a
pink one.
I’ve got red.
((Sharmaine Moser, Zoe’s Mother))
Zoe has always been a creative. She's always used her
resources. We haven't always had the most money. So,
she's really skillful with learning how to use what she has.
((NATS: Zoe Moser))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
The name of my project is The Zoe Project.
((NATS: Zoe Moser))
((Video Courtesy: Zoe’s Project))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
Hey guys. It’s Zoe and I’m the CEO of the Zoe Project.
((NATS))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
I started my project with making cards for anyone
((Photo Courtesy: Zoe’s Project))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
in nursing homes, nurses, doctors or anyone in jail, anyone
who feels forgotten. And that has leveled up. I have written
my first book called,
((Photo Courtesy: Zoe’s Project))
((Zoe Moser, Founder, The Zoe Project))
The Million Dollar Project, which is a goal planning
workbook. I wanted to remind my teachers, school people,
my friends, my family, everyone around this world, that you
cannot forget about your goals. And it’s a seven-step goal
planning workbook for all ages.
((Sharmaine Moser, Zoe’s Mother))
At 12 year old, she's not thinking about how to make money
for herself to buy like the next game or to buy the next hair
bow or hairpiece or something like that. She is creating
cards and
((Photo Courtesy: Zoe’s Project))
((Sharmaine Moser, Zoe’s Mother))
sending out the good word to individuals.
((NATS))

((PKG)) VIRTUAL LEARNING TIPS
((TRT: 2:45))
((Banner: Virtual Learning Tips))
((Reporter: Lisa Vohra))
((Camera: Lisa Vohra, Arti Jain-Kumar))
((Map: Virginia Beach, Virginia))
((Main Character: 1 female))
((MUSIC/NATS))
((Banner: Virtual Learning - Strategies))
((Arti Kumar-Jain, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love & Light 4 Kidz))
Hi, I’m Arti Kumar-Jain, the founding director of Love & Light
4 Kidz.
((Arti Kumar-Jain, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love & Light 4 Kidz))
Love & Light 4 Kidz is a program that helps with coaching for
parent, child and family.
((Arti Kumar-Jain, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love & Light 4 Kidz))
I want to thank you for this opportunity to talk to you about
how parenting has been impacted by COVID, and how we’re
entering a new era of parenting in general.
((Banner: Tips))
((MUSIC/NATS))
((Arti Kumar-Jain, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love & Light 4 Kidz))
Some tips to share that you can easily do, for yourself and
for your kids. A lot of difficulties have been faced with
technology and the role that it plays. And one of the things I
can encourage you, as a parent, is just to remember the
delicate balance that does exist and to be patient with
yourself.
((NATS: Computer))
Here is a pretest to see if you can read and understand this
story.
((Arti Kumar-Jain, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love & Light 4 Kidz))
I know in my own house we have had an exorbitant amount
of screen time, and it can be difficult even after the school
day is done, to find the balance of turning it off. And that
screen fatigue for the kids, you can be like, stop and drop
whatever you’re doing and taking mindful moment breaks.
((Banner: Mindful Moment Breaks))
Always those reminders of breathing.
((NATS: Computer))
Click the right answer.
((Arti Kumar-Jain, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love & Light 4 Kidz))
I have had children who literally have found even doing
something of a small practice such as
((Banner: Squeezing Stress Reliever))
squeezing a ball or playdough, completely that pathway from
the brain to their hand, that kinesthetic movement, that they
literally can have a shift in their behavior.
((MUSIC/NATS))
((Arti Kumar-Jain, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love & Light 4 Kidz))
If you’re still having a child who has a hard time with the
virtual school, as we are still in it for a little bit longer, fingers
crossed, is that to help them to focus is doing a quick chair
yoga pose.
((Banner: Chair Yoga))
((Arti Kumar-Jain, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love & Light 4 Kidz))
Like they can literally have their hands underneath their chair
and just putting their hands down if they want to have a shift.
They can even bring their hands and do a quick little grip.
They can even do what’s called cross-lateral, bilateral fix,
and just take their hands and just put them in. Nobody’s
going to see them, right.
((Banner: DEAR Time))
And also, building some DEAR time: Drop Everything And
Read. It’s a time that everyone can pick up something to
read, fifteen or twenty minutes on a weekend. And the kids
also love this time where you can also read something that
you find a pleasure to them.
((SOT))
Don’t talk about school. I cover my ears.
((Arti Kumar-Jain, National Certified Counselor; Director,
Love & Light 4 Kidz))
This past year has been a learning curve, for you, for me,
but also the world. And to just show yourself appreciation
and gratitude is the message that I’d like to send you.
((MUSIC/NATS))


TEASE ((VO/NAT))
Coming up
((Banner))
Manhattan on Foot
((SOT))
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
Hi! I'm so happy to see you. So happy.
I started this as a passion project to promote and give
exposure to small businesses. Having owned my own small
business, a children's bookstore, which I had for 10 years, I
truly understood what it meant.

BREAK TWO
BUMP IN ((ANIM))


BLOCK C


((PKG)) MANHATTEN SIDEWAYS
((TRT: 04:06))
((Topic Banner: Manhattan’s Hidden Treasures))
((Reporter: Olga Terekhin))
((Camera: Max Avloshenko))
((Adapted by: Zdenko Novacki))
((Map: New York City, New York))
((Main character: 1 female))
((Sub characters: 2 male))
((MUSIC/NATS))
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
I'm Betsy Bober Polivy. I've walked 155 streets on the
original Manhattan grid. It took me six years. And I
documented every single place. I took business cards from
every single business that had one.
So, I honestly have over ten thousand business cards and I
met all the owners or whoever was working there at the time.
And every single business, every garden, every school,
every firehouse, police department, tattoo parlor, hair salon
is on my website.
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
It's 2021 and I'm still walking because businesses open and
close on a daily basis. Sadly, right now, a lot of them are
closing, but I'm always trying to keep the website up to date.
((NATS))
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
Oh look, Manhattan Sideways. Who knew? Right here. I
wrote a story and he printed it.
Hi, I’m Betsy and I just saw that you have me in your
window.
((Barbershop Owner))
That’s you?
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
That’s me.
((NATS/MUSIC))
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
My husband called me the Energizer Bunny and I was out
there seven days a week, almost every single week for six
years. And he always joined me on the weekends. And no
matter how cold or how hot it was. On a July 4th, we were
out and it was over 100 degrees one year. Today, it's
freezing. But we were out there in the snow.
((NATS/MUSIC))
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
I had reached around 130th street. And I had pain in my foot.
That Monday, I went to the orthopedist and I had broken it.
And he said it was purely from walking.
I had to be off it and I said, “Well, that's not happening.”
((Photo Courtesy: sideways.nyc))
He put me in a boot and he gave me crutches and I literally
crutched from 130, whatever street it was, till 155th until I
finished.
((NATS/MUSIC))
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
Hi, Suzanne. How are you?
((Suzanne))
You found us.
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
Hi! I'm so happy to see you. So happy.
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
I started this as a passion project to promote and give
exposure to small businesses. Having owned my own small
business, a children's bookstore, which I had for 10 years, I
truly understood what it meant.
I was always trying to capture something special about each
of these people, and what their passion was, and what
inspired them to want to start a business.
Many of them, it was their father who owned it, their
grandfather who owned it, their grandmother.
A lot of them worked on Wall Street or in the financial
business, and always loved flowers or always loved making
sandwiches. And they gave up their secure job to follow
their dream.
((NATS/MUSIC))
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
And I can't tell you how many times people have said to me,
“I’ve lived here all my life and I never knew that was there”,
because we all tend to walk or take the bus or take the
subway or whatever it is commuting to where we're going, be
at work or somewhere else every day, and we go the same
way. If you're on 70th Street, you've never walked on 71st
street because you have no need to.
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
There's this amazing bakery one block over from you.
Check it out.
((NATS/MUSIC))
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
So cute.
((Betsy Bober Polivy, Founder, Manhattan Sideways))
Somebody just last night said to me, “I don't understand
what got you up every day.” She said, you know, a lot of
people could say, “Sure, I'm going to walk 155 streets”, but
nobody does it.
Around every corner, every bend, every time I entered a
business, there was something else to discover. There was
something beautiful, something fascinating, something heart-
wrenching, heartwarming.
I never was bored and
((Photo Courtesy: sideways.nyc))
I always said my favorite, favorite part was just the people.
People have contacted me from different parts of the world
and certainly from different cities and asked, “Did I want to
come and do this there?” But I always said, “I need to do
Manhattan. I need to finish Manhattan.” It's forever
changing, so I'm never going to finish Manhattan.
((NATS/MUSIC))


((PKG)) CONNECT WITH -- HELEN D’ANN DORRIS,
LIBRARIAN
((TRT: 02:26))
((Topic Banner: Connect with – Helen D’Ann Dorris))
((Reporter/Camera: Deepak Dobhal))
((Locator: Geneseo, Kansas))
((Main character: 1 female))
((NATS))
((Helen D’Ann Dorris, Librarian))
My name is Helen D’Ann Dorris. I'm 76 years old. I live here
in Geneseo, Kansas. I ended up taking this position as the
librarian, which is a part-time position.
I come from a family of nine children. I have always said, “I
wouldn't trade that for the world. I learned a lot of things
growing up in a large family.” But I wouldn't have that many
children of my own.
So, I only had two children. My first child was a Down
syndrome child. He still lives with us. He is now 53, and it
was a learning experience from day one. It makes you grow
as a person and learn to look at things from a different
perspective.
I probably would have pursued my education much earlier. I
did try. I went to business school. My parents gave up quite
a bit to, even to do that. There really weren't finances to put
all of our children, my brothers and sisters, through school.
So, I probably now realize that I probably could have done
better on that on my own than, but you know, as a young
person, you want to explore the world and you want to see
what's out there and you want to try things you've never tried
before and some of them aren’t always good things. But you
still try them, and you learn.
I got married. Unfortunately, that did not work out. It was
very brief. So, I went back home, and I worked just around
where my parents lived, and I met my husband there.
Actually I met him because I babysat the lady that he was
going on a date with. I babysat her son so they could go on
a date. That's how I met my husband. The next week, he
was at my door asking me out.
Two years ago, we renewed our wedding vows on our 50th
wedding anniversary. My granddaughter officiated at the
ceremony. That was pretty neat.
((MUSIC))

CLOSING ((ANIM))
voanews.com/connect

BREAK THREE
BUMP IN ((ANIM))


CLOSING ((ANIM))
voanews.com/connect

SHOW ENDS


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