Tewolde Gebremariam, Chief Executive Officer of Ethiopian Airlines, poses for a photograph after speaking to The Associated Press at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, March 23, 2019.
Tewolde Gebremariam, Chief Executive Officer of Ethiopian Airlines, poses for a photograph after speaking to The Associated Press at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, March 23, 2019.

The head of Ethiopian Airlines said "many questions on the B-737 MAX airplane remain without answers" and he pledged "full and transparent cooperation to discover what went wrong."

"Until we have answers, putting one more life at risk is too much," CEO Tewolde Gebremariam said Monday in a statement.

"Immediately after the crash and owing to the similarity with the Lion Air Accident, we grounded our fleet of Max 8s. Within days, the plane had been grounded around the world. I fully support this," Gebremariam said.

A March 10 Ethiopian Airlines crash and Indonesia's Lion Air crash in October were both Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes. Everyone on board the two flights was killed.

The Ethiopian Airlines flight data recorders revealed that there were "clear similarities" between the two doomed flights.

Lion Air's Boeing 737 Max 8 airplane is parked on the tarmac of Soekarno Hatta International airport near Jakarta, Indonesia, March 15, 2019.
Ethiopia and Indonesia Crash Parallels Heap Pressure on Boeing
Investigators into the Boeing 737 MAX crash in Ethiopia have found striking similarities in a vital flight angle with an airplane that came down off Indonesia, a source said, piling pressure on the world's biggest planemaker.The Ethiopian Airlines disaster eight days ago killed 157 people, led to the grounding of Boeing's marquee MAX fleet globally and sparked a high-stakes inquiry for the aviation industry.Analysis of the cockpit recorder showed its "angle of attack" data was "very, very similar" to…

Gebremariam asserted that his crews were "well trained" on this aircraft.

"We are the the only airline in Africa, among the very few in the world, with the B-737 full flight Simulator," he said. "Contrary to some media reports, our pilots who fly the new model were trained on all appropriate simulators."

United Airlines planes, including a Boeing 737 MAX 9 model, are pictured at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, Texas, March 18, 2019.
Boeing to Brief Pilots, Regulators as it Eyes 737 MAX Return
U.S. airplane manufacturer Boeing says it plans to hold a briefing Wednesday for 200 pilots, technical leaders and regulators as it works toward returning its 737 MAX planes to service following two deadly crashes. The company said in a statement it is working to have sessions with all operators of the 737 MAX and national aviation regulators. "At the same time, we continue to work closely with our customers and regulators on software and training updates for the 737 MAX.

"In a nation that sometimes is saddled with negative stereotypes, accidents like this affect our sense of pride," Gebremariam said. "Yet this tragedy won't define us. We pledge to work with Boeing and our colleagues in all the airlines to make air travel even safer."