Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa,  Ethiopia, Monday, March 11, 2019.
Rescuers work at the scene of an Ethiopian Airlines flight crash near Bishoftu, or Debre Zeit, south of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Monday, March 11, 2019.

ADDIS ABABA - An Ethiopian official said a preliminary report on the plane crash that killed 157 people on March 10 will be made public later this week.

Mussie Yiheyis, spokesman for the government's transport ministry, told The Associated Press Tuesday that a date has not yet been set but it will be released later this week. He said that a high ranking government official will announce the preliminary result.

Lion Air's Boeing 737 Max 8 airplane is parked on the tarmac of Soekarno Hatta International airport near Jakarta, Indonesia, March 15, 2019.
Ethiopia and Indonesia Crash Parallels Heap Pressure on Boeing
Investigators into the Boeing 737 MAX crash in Ethiopia have found striking similarities in a vital flight angle with an airplane that came down off Indonesia, a source said, piling pressure on the world's biggest planemaker.The Ethiopian Airlines disaster eight days ago killed 157 people, led to the grounding of Boeing's marquee MAX fleet globally and sparked a high-stakes inquiry for the aviation industry.Analysis of the cockpit recorder showed its "angle of attack" data was "very, very similar" to…


The final report may take months to complete but a preliminary report may be released "anytime soon," said the spokesman.

Tewolde Gebremariam, Chief Executive Officer of Ethiopian Airlines, poses for a photograph after speaking to The Associated Press at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, March 23, 2019.
Ethiopian Airlines Chief: 'Many Questions' Remain About Boeing Aircraft
Ethiopian Airlines crash and Indonesia's Lion Air crash in October were both Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes

On Monday, Ethiopian Airlines' CEO Tewolde Gebremariam said the pilots of the plane that crashed on the outskirts of the capital, Addis Ababa, had trained on "all appropriate simulators," rejecting reports that they had not been adequately prepared to handle the new aircraft.