Key events in Ivory Coast political crisis, culminating in capture of former President Laurent Gbagbo
Late 2010 After five years of delays, Ivory Coast holds a presidential election. Incumbent Laurent Gbagbo leads after first round but official results show him losing  run-off to former Prime Minister Alassane Ouattara. The Gbagbo-controlled constitutional council annuls 10  percent of  ballots as fraudulent and proclaims Mr. Gbagbo  winner.
December 2010 The United Nations, African Union, the west African bloc ECOWAS recognize Mr. Ouattara's victory and urge Mr. Gbagbo to step down.  The incumbent refuses and his forces blockade Mr. Ouattara in an Abidjan hotel, where he is protected by U.N. peacekeepers.
December 2010/January 2011 ECOWAS and  AU send mediators to Abidjan in unsuccessful attempts to resolve the power struggle peacefully.  The West African regional bank cuts off Mr. Gbagbo's access to state funds. Gbagbo troops fight deadly battles in Abidjan with Ouattara supporters.
March 2011 Pro-Ouattara fighters, including former rebels from Ivory Coast's 2002 civil war, capture towns in western Ivory Coast, near border with Liberia.
March 28, 2011 Pro-Ouattara fighters launch a huge offensive, capturing towns and cities across Ivory Coast and moving to outskirts of Abidjan within four days.
April 4 French and U.N. helicopters attack Gbagbo-controlled heavy weapons in Abidjan, on the grounds they are being used to attack civilians and U.N. peacekeepers. French and Ivorian officials say Mr. Gbagbo is negotiating surrender, but the incumbent then gives interviews insisting he won election.
April 6 Gbagbo loyalists fight off an attack by Ouattara forces on the presidential compound.
April 10 French and U.N. helicopters launch airstrikes on the compound.
April 11 Mr. Gbagbo is captured at residence after assault by pro-Ouattara fighters, aided by French special forces.