Damages of a school are seen after an airstrike by the eastern forces military aircraft in Zara district in Tripoli, Libya, April 13, 2019.
Damages of a school are seen after an airstrike by the eastern forces military aircraft in Zara district in Tripoli, Libya, April 13, 2019.

UNITED NATIONS - A proposed U.N. resolution demands that all parties in Libya immediately de-escalate the fighting and commit to a cease-fire.

The British-drafted resolution, circulated to Security Council members and obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press, also calls on all parties to immediately re-commit to attending a U.N.-facilitated political dialogue “and work toward a comprehensive political solution to the crisis in Libya.”

The draft resolution expresses “grave concern” at military activity near Tripoli, which began after Field Marshal Khalifa Hifter’s self-styled Libyan National Army — aligned with a rival government in the east — launched its offensive on April 3. The internationally supported U.N.-backed government, which is weaker, is based in Tripoli.

It says the offensive “threatens the stability of Libya” and prospects for the national dialogue and a political solution in Libya, and has had a “serious humanitarian impact.”

Libyan military commander Khalifa Haftar walks with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi at the Presidential Palace in Cairo,Apr. 14, 2019 in this handout picture courtesy of the Egyptian Presidency.
UN: 120 Killed Since Fighting Broke Out in Libya

More than 120 people have been killed since a Libyan military commander launched an assault on the capital 10 days ago, igniting clashes with rival militias, the U.N. health agency said Sunday.

The self-styled Libyan National Army, led by Field Marshal Khalifa Hifter, launched a surprise offensive against Tripoli on April 5 and is battling rival militias loosely affiliated with a weak U.N.-backed government.
 
The World Health Organization said 121 people have been killed in the fighting and another 561 have been wounded.

The Security Council is divided over Hifter’s offensive.

Hifter is supported by Russia, France, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates who see him as the best hope of stabilizing the troubled country and combatting extremists.

A proposed press statement soon after the offensive began that urged the Libyan National Army to halt the offensive was blocked by Russia, one of the permanent council members. Such statements require approval by all 15 council members.

The proposal stresses the need for the parties to engage with U.N. envoy Ghassan Salame “with the aim of achieving a Libyan-led and Libyan-owned political solution to bring security, political and economic sustainability, and national unity to Libya.”