This photo taken July 18, 2017, shows Chief Rabbi Gabriel Davidovich delivering a speech during the commemoration of the 23rd anniversary of a terrorist bombing attack against a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires.
This photo taken July 18, 2017, shows Chief Rabbi Gabriel Davidovich delivering a speech during the commemoration of the 23rd anniversary of a terrorist bombing attack against a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires.

President Mauricio Macri of Argentina is promising to track down and punish those who beat and robbed the country's chief rabbi in his Buenos Aires home.

Macri's human rights office says Argentina needs to build a society "where there are no signs of anti-Semitism, and we cannot be indifferent."

Assailants broke into Rabbi Gabriel Davidovich's home Monday, badly beating him before running off with money and personal belongings.

Davidovich is hospitalized with broken ribs, a damaged lung and other injuries.

Argentina's President Mauricio Macri speaks during
Argentina's President Mauricio Macri speaks during a meeting with Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro in Brasilia, Brazil, Jan. 16, 2019.

Israeli President Reuven Rivlen telephoned the rabbi to express his disgust. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu also strongly condemned the attack.

"We must not let anti-Semitism rear its head. I strongly condemn the recent acts of anti-Semitism, and call on the international community to take action against it."

Netanyahu was referring to other recent crimes against Jews, including the desecration of tombstones in a Jewish cemetery in France.

Argentina, home to one of the world's largest Jewish populations, is also no stranger to anti-Semitism.

A suicide bombing on the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires killed 29 in 1992, followed two years later by another blast at a Jewish group headquarters, killing 85. 

Argentina blamed both bombings on Hezbollah militants acting on behalf of Iran. Iran denied responsibility.

Child Marriage