Ricardo Gonzalez holds her 8-month old daughter Keyla as his son Antonio, right, 3, talks to him at their home in the  Juan Pablo II shanty town in Santiago, Chile, Jan. 23, 2013.
Ricardo Gonzalez holds her 8-month old daughter Keyla as his son Antonio, right, 3, talks to him at their home in the Juan Pablo II shanty town in Santiago, Chile, Jan. 23, 2013.

SANTIAGO - The number of slums in Chile, one of Latin America's most prosperous and stable economies, has nearly doubled since 2011, the government said on Wednesday, as an influx of migrants increasingly face a lack of low-income housing and rising rents.

Chile's Housing Ministry said it had identified 822 slums in Chile that largely lack access to basic services like water, sewage disposal and electricity, an increase of 78 percent from 2011.

A low-income neighborhood is seen through the roof
A low-income neighborhood is seen through the roof of a shanty on a hillside in the Chilean coastal city of Valparaiso on June 29, 2005.

The slums comprise a total of 46,423 homes, the ministry said in a statement, of which only 10 percent had access to potable water.

Chile and other comparatively wealthy Latin American nations are absorbing a wave of mass migration from destitute nations in the region such as Haiti and Venezuela, increasing demands on social services.

Immigration into Chile has increased more than sixfold in around 25 years, from 114,500 in the 1992 census to 746,465 last year.

Chile has the highest GDP (gross domestic product) per capita in South America, low levels of corruption and the lowest murder rate, according to figures from the World Bank and InSight Crime, a foundation that analyses organized crime.