Tourists gather around the Capitol pond with the Washington Monument in the background on a hot day in Washington, DC as temperature rises into the upper 80s Fahrenheit, Friday, July 19, 2019. (Photo by Diaa Bekheet)
Tourists gather around the Capitol pond with the Washington Monument in the background on a hot day in Washington, DC as temperature rises into the upper 80s Fahrenheit, Friday, July 19, 2019. (Photo by Diaa Bekheet)

Two Latin American countries are warning their citizens against travel to the United States after mass shootings killed 31 people last weekend. 

Venezuela and Uruguay warned their residents about violence and hate crimes in the United States.

Uruguayans were told to take "extreme precautions" when traveling go the U.S. because local authorities are unable to stop mass shootings, the foreign ministry said. 

"Due to factors such as the indiscriminate possession of firearms by the population, it is especially advisable to avoid places where large concentrations of people occur," the statement said.

The Venezuelan foreign ministry recommended its citizens "postpone travel" to America in light of "violence and indiscriminate hate crimes."

The Japanese consulate in Detroit also warned Japanese residents and visitors to  "be aware of the potential for gunfire incidents everywhere in the United States."

The warnings come days after a gunman opened fire at a shopping center in El Paso, Texas, killing 22. Hours later, hundreds of miles away, another gunman began shooting in Dayton, Ohio, killing nine. 

In the past, Germany, New Zealand, Canada, Ireland, China and the Bahamas have also issued travel warning for the U.S.