FILE - Jean-Jacques Savin, 71, works on the construction of a ship made from a barrel at the shipyard in Ares, southwestern France, Nov. 15, 2018.
FILE - Jean-Jacques Savin, 71, works on the construction of a ship made from a barrel at the shipyard in Ares, southwestern France, Nov. 15, 2018.

A French septuagenarian, armed with a block of foie gras and a couple of bottles of wine, has set sail across the Atlantic in a barrel.

Jean-Jacques Savin, 71, set off from El Hierro in Spain's Canary Islands and hopes to end his 4,500-kilometer journey to the Caribbean in about three months, relying only on ocean currents and trade winds.

"The weather is great. I've got a swell of one meter and I'm moving at 2 to 3 kilometers an hour. … I've got favorable winds forecast until Sunday," Savin told AFP shortly after he set off. 

He described his journey as a "crossing during which man isn't captain of his ship, but a passenger of the ocean."

Savin spent several months building his bright orange, barrel-shaped capsule of resin-coated plywood that is strong enough to withstand the constant battering of waves and possible orca attacks.

FILE - Jean-Jacques Savin, 71, sits aboard his shi
FILE - Jean-Jacques Savin, 71, sits aboard his ship made from a barrel at the shipyard in Ares, southwestern France, Nov. 15, 2018.

The barrel, measuring 3 meters long and 2.10 meters across, is equipped with a kitchen area, and a mattress with straps to keep him from being tossed around by rough seas.

He is also carrying a bottle of Sauternes white wine and a block of foie gras for New Year's Eve, and a bottle of Saint-Émilion red wine for his birthday in January, according to AFP.

Portholes on either side of the barrel and another looking into the water will provide the entertainment. It also has a solar panel that generates energy for communications and GPS positioning.

WATCH: Frenchman Begins Cross-Atlantic Voyage in a Barrel

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As he drifts along, Savin will drop markers in the ocean to help oceanographers study ocean currents. Savin will be studied by doctors for effects of solitude in close confinement.

He will also post daily updates including GPS coordinates, tracking the journey on a Facebook page

Savin's adventure, which will cost a little more than $65,000, was funded by French barrel makers and crowdfunding.

Savin hopes to end his journey on a French island, such as Martinique or Guadeloupe. "That would be easier for the paperwork and for bringing the barrel back," he told AFP.